GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, NJ - The overall visitation pattern to Atlantic City, New Jersey reflects ongoing changes in the profile of the resort visitor, who is less likely to be a convenience gambler and more likely to stay overnight, said Dr. Israel Posner, executive director of the Lloyd D. Levenson Institute for Gaming, Hospitality & Tourism at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

“Occupied hotel room nights rose almost 3 percent  - to an all-time high in 2012,” Dr. Posner said.

Visitors to the resort made 4.3 percent fewer trips in 2012 than in 2011, with the number of casino bus passengers continuing its 25-year slide, according to an analysis by the Lloyd D. Levenson Institute.

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“Considering the devastating impact of super storm Sandy in late October and November on Atlantic City’s feeder markets in central and northern New Jersey, we expected an even larger drop in visitation,” said Dr. Posner.

Annual trips to Atlantic City by visitors in 2012 totaled 27.23 million, down from 28.45 million the previous year, according to data provided to the Lloyd D. Levenson Institute by the South Jersey Transportation Authority and analyzed by the institute.

The Lloyd D. Levenson Institute determined that 2.5 million passengers arrived by casino bus in 2012, trending down from a 1988 peak of 14.2 million. Visitors took 274,000 trips to the resort by air, down 2.8 percent year over year. Rail trips fell 5.3 percent, to 194,000.

Overall in 2012, 87 percent of visitors arrived by personal auto, 9 percent by casino bus, 2 percent by transit bus, 1 percent by air and 1 percent by rail. The trend lines for modes of arrival were unchanged since 2005, when there were 27.9 million visit trips by automobile, Dr. Posner said.

For more information, contact Dr. Israel Posner, (posneri@stockton.edu) executive director, Lloyd D. Levenson Institute of Gaming, Hospitality and Tourism at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (www.stockton.edu/levenson)

About the Lloyd D. Levenson Institute of Gaming, Hospitality and Tourism: The Lloyd D. Levenson Institute of Gaming, Hospitality and Tourism (LIGHT) (www.stockton.edu/levesnon<http://www.stockton.edu/levesnon>) in The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey’s School of Business provides a forum for the exploration of major trends facing the tourism, hospitality and casino gaming industries. LIGHT collects, analyzes and disseminates reliable information and helps generate scientific knowledge in support of these vital New Jersey industries.