GLEN ROCK, NJ – Trustees are moving forward with a district-wide demographic study, which will help the board of education assess student population.

“We are growing so quickly… It’s crowded,” said Glen Rock Schools Superintendent Brett Charleston during the September 10 board meeting. “There are no empty classrooms in some buildings, so we need to get an idea of how many students we can expect over the next five years so we can plan accordingly – whether its through capital projects – things that we need to do so we can meet the educational needs of our students and the expectations of the parents and the community.”

A purchase order in the sum of $13,200, according to liaison Kevin Brennan, has been cut to solicit the services of the firm Statistical Forecasting – the same firm the board of education in neighboring Fair Lawn used to project their past and future enrollment rates. These findings evinced the need for Fair Lawn's $25 million expansion of its two middle schools, which is currently underway. The monies for the study are within the board's current budget, Brennan said.   

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Glen Rock’s last demographic study was conducted in 2014. The forthcoming study will garner projections for the student population in the next five years, beginning with the 2020-2021 school year. The study, which will take three months to complete before a presentation is had before the board, will also include a housing turnover analysis, data of which will lay out the number of homes on the market and the size of a buyer’s family, among other pertinent information.    

Board Member Megan Findley applauded the idea for the housing turnover analysis, agreeing with the superintendent that the report would provide data “beneficial” to making decisions going forward. 

“I can think of at least three proposed developments in the community that are multi-family or affordable housing,” said Findley.

Trustee Sheldon Hirschberg concurred. He said noted that Glen Rock’s affordable housing commitment, for one, is a “component of this study that must be addressed, as well.”  

“I support your study because I think it’s needed,” he said. “But I also think you need to sit down with this individual and say our town is in flux right now because of the issues.”