Wynnewood, PA -- On September 25, 2018, Facebook suffered the largest data breach in company history, with approximately 50 million users on the social media site affected. TAPinto The Mainline estimates more than 40,000 residents of Lower Merion Township had their data exposed in this breach.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Lower Merion Township was last reported to have an estimated population of 59,089. Using Statista data on Facebook usage rate, approximately 42,544 Facebook accounts in Lower Merion were placed at risk by the Facebook data breach on September 25, 2018.

Merion Station, PA, resident Victor Muth said of the data breach, "It doesn't bother me." Muthu went on to add that he doesn't like the data breaches happening but asked, "What are you going to do?"

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The Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro cautioned all Pennsylvanians about this breach, providing tips on how to protect yourself from identity theft and other possible issues with a compromised Facebook account.

No consequences from this breach have been reported. Chester Wisniewski, a principal research scientist at the security firm Sophos, told the publication Fast Company that "there's no evidence"  any user data has been leaked online. But Google was just caught up in the fallout from the Facebook breach, as it's been reported that the advertising juggernaut and search engine company failed to disclose a problem with its own social media platform, Google+, that led to data from more than 500,000 accounts being compromised.

One of the details of the Google breach was that up to 438 different third-party applications may have had access to private information. Facebook also utilizes a lot of apps, integrating them with its platform to make it convenient for users to move in and out of websites and phone apps through an easy one-click Facebook connection.

 

TAPinto the Mainline infographic on Facebook Use

 

According to AdWeek there are 9 million apps and websites integrated with Facebook. These are the things you click "use my Facebook" account when using Facebook every day, be it an order through Door Dash or the latest Myers-Briggs Personality test. These are also the kind of things companies like Cambridge Analytica used to mine people's data.

"I only have two apps connected to my Facebook," said Muthu. He purposely tries not to connect apps to his Facebook account, he explained.