These days, there are reality TV shows for every possible scenario. Right now, I'm watching Doomsday Preppers on National Geographic. I've spent more than a few hours watching water treatment, bunker preparation, and food conservation.

We've lived through our share of apocalypse in the last few years: with the doomsday preachers, the Mayan legends, and the strange, off-season weather, it's easy to see how the apocalypse can be fresh in so many minds.

In our line of work, we spend a lot of time remediating disasters that have already happened, and as such, it's hard to not plan out what we would do in the future.

Sign Up for E-News

Now, our family is less intense than the reality show, but we do stop and think of how we can best prepare for unexpected hardship by following the CDC recommendations.  While we might not keep a basement full of preparations, we feel confident that our supplies will help us weather whatever storm will come our way.

 

  • Water—one gallon per person, per day (3­day supply for evacuation, 2­week supply for home)
  • Food—non­perishable, easy­to­prepare items (3­day supply for evacuation, 2­week supply for home)
  • Flashlight
  • Battery­powered or hand­crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible)
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Medications (7­day supply) and medical items
  • Multi­purpose tool
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Family and emergency contact information
  • Extra cash
  • Emergency blanket
  • Map(s) of the area

For more information: http://emergency.cdc.gov/preparedness/kit/disasters/

Over the next month, we will explore the practical, everyday ways that you too can prepare for potential disasters, even if you haven't been graced with a camera crew to follow the process!

Stay tuned next for ways that you can prepare your businesses and keep working, even in the event of a disaster.

Robin Hoy, Cranford NJ