WAYNE, NJ – The U.S. News and World Report recently came out with their 2020 best high school rankings and out of 17,792 schools across the nation, both Wayne Hills and Wayne Valley were ranked in the top 13 percent of schools.

Superintendent of Wayne Schools, Dr. Mark Toback proudly made the announcement at last week’s Board of Education meeting. “The Wayne Township Public Schools are proud to announce that both Wayne high schools were included among the best high schools in New Jersey and the United States,” he said.

“Wayne Hills was ranked 101 out of 409 high schools in New Jersey and 2,244 out of 17,792 high schools nationally, said Toback. “While Wayne Valley was ranked 104 among 409 high schools in New Jersey, and 2,362 among the 17,792 high schools across the United States.”

According to the U.S. News and World Report Website: “Schools were ranked on six factors based on performance on state assessments and how well they prepare students for college.  A great high school educates all students from different social and economic backgrounds, exposing them to challenging coursework on the path to graduation. The highest ranked U.S. public schools in U.S. News & World Report's 2020 Best High Schools rankings are those whose attendees demonstrated outstanding outcomes above expectations in math and reading state assessments, passed a diverse array of college-level exams and graduated in high proportions.”

  • College Readiness 30%
    • The proportions of 12th graders who took and passed at least one AP or IB exam. Passing is worth three times more than just taking.
  • Math and Reading Proficiency 20%
    • Aggregated scores on state assessments that students may be required to pass for graduation.
  • Math and Reading Performance 20%
    • How aggregated scores on state assessments compare to U.S. News's expectations given the proportions of students who are black, Hispanic and from low-income households.
  • Underserved Student Performance 10%
    • Scores on state assessments aggregated just among students who are black, Hispanic and from low-income households. These scores are compared to what is typical in the state for non-undeserved students, with parity or higher being the goal.
  • College Curriculum Breadth 10%
    • The proportions of 12th graders who took and passed AP and IB exams in multiple areas. More exams are valued more than fewer exams up to a maximum of four. Passing an exam is worth three times more than taking.
  • Graduation Rate 10%
    • The proportion of entering 9th graders who graduated four academic years later.