BASKING RIDGE, N.J. — Governor Chris Christie’s job ratings in New Jersey have continued to decline according to a Monmouth University poll. Approximately two-thirds of constituents in N.J. say that Christie is more concerned about politics than the well being of the state. 
The majority of voters — 58 percent versus 32 percent — said that they believe that Hillary Clinton would be a better president than Christie. In terms of the Republican ticket, residents are split between 46 percent for Christie and 36 percent for Jeb Bush, the former governor of Florida. 
“Clinton leading Christie in ‘Blue Jersey’ isn’t too much of a shock, but Jeb Bush’s competitiveness among Garden State Republicans should give the governor pause,” said Patrick Murray, the director of the independent Monmouth University Polling Institute in West Long Branch, N.J. 
 
Governor Christie’s job rating is 48 percent approve compared to 44 percent who disapprove amongst Jersey residents. In the fall, his rating stood at 46 percent approve versus 39 percent who disapprove. 
 “Christie’s ratings stabilized last spring after a big Bridgegate-related drop. But as his travel schedule increased and presidential speculation grew during last fall’s campaign, state voter opinion started to erode again, slowly but steadily,” Murray said.
Christie’s trade mission to Great Britain this month was for his presidential future according to 65 percent of those in New Jersey. 
In total, 38 percent of those from New Jersey have a favorable view of Governor Christie as a person and 40 percent have an unfavorable view. The poll also found that 52 percent feel that Christie does not have the right temperament to be president while 44 percent believe he does. According to Monmouth, the results from this poll were similar to that taken a year ago where 54 percent said Christie does not have the right temperament and 41 said he does. 

The Monmouth University Poll was conducted with 805 New Jersey adults over the phone which included 712 registered voters from Jan. 30 – Feb. 2, 2015. 

BASKING RIDGE, N.J. — Governor Chris Christie’s job ratings in New Jersey have continued to decline according to a Monmouth University poll. Approximately two-thirds of constituents in N.J. say that Christie is more concerned about politics than the well being of the state.

The majority of voters — 58 percent versus 32 percent — said that they believe that Hillary Clinton would be a better president than Christie. In terms of the Republican ticket, residents are split between 46 percent for Christie and 36 percent for Jeb Bush, the former governor of Florida.

“Clinton leading Christie in ‘Blue Jersey’ isn’t too much of a shock, but Jeb Bush’s competitiveness among Garden State Republicans should give the governor pause,” said Patrick Murray, the director of the independent Monmouth University Polling Institute in West Long Branch, N.J.

Governor Christie’s job rating is 48 percent approve compared to 44 percent who disapprove amongst Jersey residents. In the fall, his rating stood at 46 percent approve versus 39 percent who disapprove.

“Christie’s ratings stabilized last spring after a big Bridgegate-related drop. But as his travel schedule increased and presidential speculation grew during last fall’s campaign, state voter opinion started to erode again, slowly but steadily,” Murray said.

Christie’s trade mission to Great Britain this month was for his presidential future according to 65 percent of those in New Jersey.

In total, 38 percent of those from New Jersey have a favorable view of Governor Christie as a person and 40 percent have an unfavorable view. The poll also found that 52 percent feel that Christie does not have the right temperament to be president while 44 percent believe he does. According to Monmouth, the results from this poll were similar to that taken a year ago where 54 percent said Christie does not have the right temperament and 41 said he does.

The Monmouth University Poll was conducted with 805 New Jersey adults over the phone which included 712 registered voters from Jan. 30 – Feb. 2, 2015.