BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NJ - Gastroenterologist Dr. Robert Schuman, of Berkeley Heights, was honored with the Jody A. Morrow Humanitarian Award at the American Cancer Society’s 38th Annual Diamond Ball on November 19, at the Westmount Country Club in Woodland Park, NJ.

Dr. Schuman was among a team of doctors from Saint Barnabas Medical Center who teamed up with Health Wagon to provide specialized free care to medically underserved in the Appalachian region of Wise, VA..

“These missions have been the most rewarding experiences in my career, touching people and saving lives for those that need the help most,” said Dr. Schuman. During Dr. Schuman’s trip last October, he treated several patients with precancerous lesions. He removed the lesions and likely saved them from developing cancer.

Sign Up for E-News

Throughout Dr. Schuman's career, he has tried to impact lives through education and treatment of gastrointestinal illnesses with an emphasis on colon cancer prevention and treatment. He looks forward to performing even more philanthropic missions, continuing his education of the public, and performing research, with the hope of one day making cancer a thing of the past.

_________________________________________

The Jody A. Morrow Humanitarian Award was created in 2003 to honor the memory of a fantastic and courageous woman who devoted her time and energy to the American Cancer Society’s Diamond Ball, and helped enrich the lives of countless others. As a cancer survivor for many years, she was an inspiration, a source of courage and hope. Jody lost her 13 year battle with lymphoma in 2003.  The award in her honor was designed to honor individuals and organizations who personify the traits that made Jody so special, including her unwavering commitment to the fight against cancer. Honorees have included cancer survivors, caregivers and American Cancer Society volunteers who have committed their time, talent and efforts to create a world without cancer.

About Health Wagon: The Health Wagon, with its mobile clinic and two stationary clinics, has remained a pioneer in the delivery of health care in the central Appalachian region for more than three decades. The Health Wagon provides Southwest Virginia and the surrounding region with compassionate, high quality health care services. They serve the most vulnerable in their population that do not have access to health care. Their patients have no insurance or may have insurance but have high co-pays and deductibles. Health Wagon creates a medical home for their patients and give access to health care services that they would otherwise do without. Daily at their clinic, someone’s life is forever changed or saved because of the services of that the Health Wagon offers. They create access and more importantly hope to those who come through their doors.