In preparation for the Berkeley Heights Township Council election on Nov. 3, questions were submitted to each candidate.

There are four candidates running for two open seats on the Township Council. The candidates are incumbents Craig Pastore (R), and first time candidates Michael D’Aquila (R), Bill Machado (D) and Rina Franchino (D).   

GET TO KNOW INCUMBENT BOARD OF EDUCATION CANDIDATE MICHAEL D'AQUILA (R):

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Background
  • Maritime College- Engineering 
  • UMDNJ/NJCU/Honeywell-Facility Manager
  • Managed a $10.5 million budget for Building Operations and Environmental Services
  • Managed construction/facility projects up to $30 million
  • Mayor's Advisory Committee
  • Environmental Commission
1. In light of the projected new development (Little Flower, Roosevelt Avenue, New York  Mart) what are the legal limits to prevent residential and /or commercial over development in Berkeley Heights?
 
The main reason why I moved from Staten Island to New Jersey was for this exact reason, over development.  I support what the Town Council is doing with respect to challenging the court’s ruling on COAH obligations to ensure we do not have overdevelopment in our town and to protect us from Builders Remedy Lawsuits.  The council needs to work with the Planning and Zoning Boards to ensure we have a good mix of housing and commercial development to attract people to live and do business in Berkeley Heights. 
 
2. Union County gives out community grants to towns. What specifically would you ask to be funded by such a grant?
From the county, state or Federal government is an excellent way to see resident’s taxes reinvested in our town.I would look to continue to apply for grants to improve our roads, address flooding issues, plus other incentives around energy savings.  When I was a member of the Environmental Commission, we were successful in obtaining an energy audit of the various municipal buildings that was funded by a grant from the Board of Public Utilities (BPU).  This identified various items that were addressed by the town and resulted in lower gas and electric usage in township buildings.