NEW PROVIDENCE, NJ - Around 65 (and growing number of) students of grade-2 & up are learning an easy, youngster-friendly algorithm compiled by Team AIRO to solve Rubik's Cube. Many parents are also joining the workshops enthusiastically to learn.

The community activity of 7th grade boys Team AIRO, including New Providence residents, (Om Desai, Gyan Ghoda & Siddhant Desai) with an unique concept "Young Students Teaching Younger Kids" continues. Team AIRO have compiled an easy, youngster-friendly algorithm by taking all the goodies from various complicated algorithms to solve a Rubik's Cube.  Samarth Desai (4th grade) has partnered with Team AIRO in creating the algorithm.  

So far they have conducted 4 workshops in March-2017 to teach an algorithm to around 65 kids (grade-2 & up) from the towns of New Providence, Chatham, Madison, Berkeley Heights, Livingston, Monmouth junction, Morristown, Warren, Jersey City, Edison, Nutley, Westfield, Mountainside, and Scotch Plains. For a very reasonable donation, students received a Speed Rubik's Cube to take home, a 40 pages algorithm with details such that smallest mistake can be avoided, and a 3 page summary of the same algorithm which kids can keep in front of them while practicing.

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As always, the goal is to create a learning-cycle in the surrounding towns where more and more youth gets motivated to continue the story of "Young Students Teaching Younger Kids".  In fact, for this workshop two 4th grade boys (Samarth Desai and Abdd Sharma) has teamed up with Team AIRO to volunteer teaching.

Loosely speaking this a "STEM Sport". Rubik's Cube, for decades is a well known sport. There are competitions and a new fastest time world records is made every few months now a days.  Algorithm is a step-by-step process of solving any problem. That is a science element in this sport. Once kids as young as grade-2 learn how to understand and use an algorithm for one problem solving, they know how a different algorithm can be learned and used for another problem solving. Also, once you learn an algorithm, you can 'teach' that to a computer or to a robot (i.e. program those steps). That all, along with its own advantages of practicing Rubik's Cube.

In order to know more about Team AIRO and their community activities, visit their web-site: www.airobotics.us. In order to keep in touch with ongoing and upcoming activities, be 'friends' with Team AIRO on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011204075059. You can also subscribe to the Team AIRO YouTube channel: Click Here

Team AIRO can be contacted at: 2016airo@gmail.com