The New Jersey Coalition Against Human Trafficking (NJCAHT) has reinvented itself with renewed focus on ensuring that New Jersey becomes a safer place through anti-human trafficking steps that are now clearly spelled out in a family-friendly way on NJCAHT's new website, safernj.org (formerly njhumantrafficking.org).

It all started out when NJCAHT entered a rebranding makeover contest for underfunded nonprofits called "Give a Brand!" offered by full service creative agency, Thinkso, which is based in Manhattan. NJCAHT members, friends, and community members were encouraged to visit Thinkso's website to vote for NJCAHT. After announcing that NJCAHT had won the contest, Thinkso got to work on a new look, before launching the new brand and website on Monday.

Executive Director Kate Lee notes that the inclusive, broadened, warm approach seen in the new brand works especially well, "because everyone in the community has a role to play in stopping human trafficking." NJCAHT's reveal on Monday featured legislators who have been longtime at the forefront of New Jersey's successful anti-trafficking efforts and who welcomed NJCAHT's rebrand."You've already made NJ a safer state," said US Rep Chris Smith (R-NJ 4th District). "Because of your work, human trafficking has become much more visible...the invisibility allowed it to prosper. Until educated, everybody kind of looked away. You are the victim's best friend and the trafficker's worst nightmare."

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Over the years the NJCAHT helped the public and even legislators understand "the complexities and nuances of human trafficking," said Assemblywoman Valerie Huttle (D-37)."We understand it doesn't always look like it does on TV shows," Huttle said. "I applaud the survivors who become advocates. New Jersey has passed legislation aimed at ending human trafficking. But also supporting survivors as you presented your rebranding and focusing your work on bringing in new communities especially in the age of COVID-19, when so many young adults are online more than ever, and unfortunately targeted."

Sen Tom Kean Jr (R-21) agreed it's important to renew New Jersey's commitment to anti-trafficking efforts each January."Congratulations on the rebrand and to the Coalition for what it has done over the years to find real solutions, to educate people to keep New Jersey residents safe all year, and raising awareness during Human Trafficking Prevention Month in January, and all year," said Kean. "It's a bipartisan effort and these educational efforts are really lifelines."



The rebrand also features new messaging strategy, including the new tagline, “Let’s create a safer state," an educational brochure listing the "red flags" of human trafficking, banners for display at events, T-shirt design, and car magnets.

"I cannot think of a better way to begin a new year than by announcing a new chapter for the New Jersey Coalition Against Human Trafficking", said NJCAHT President Danny Papa. "This is a fresh start for what we believe will be a year of impact for the coalition...We will create a safer state through education, innovative programming, and by empowering survivors...together we will create a safer New Jersey for everyone."

PRESS CONTACT
Media@safernj.org

About the New Jersey Coalition Against Human Trafficking
The New Jersey Coalition Against Human Trafficking (NJCAHT) is a fully volunteer-run 501c3 nonprofit founded in 2011 that coordinates statewide community efforts to end sex and labor trafficking in New Jersey. Comprising of 200 volunteers and more than 180 affiliates—including nonprofits, faith-based organizations, academics, law enforcement, and direct service providers it works to empower communities with the knowledge of what human trafficking is, how to prevent it, and how to support those affected by it. NJCAHT organizes speaking events, outreach, and educational programs to inform people of all ages about the physical, psychological, and financial effects of human trafficking and forced labor—and how they can help prevent or end it.