CHATHAM, NJ -Nathalie Miebach, a professional artist who specializes in sculpture, recently joined Chatham High School environmental science and art students for the day.

During her visit, Miebach presented a lecture explaining her process of gathering weather observations using very simple data-collecting devices, followed by the translation of the data into sculpture. The data is then translated into musical scores, which are then interpreted through collaborations with musicians.

Following the lecture, art students engaged in the creation of their own sculptures based on 
 
weather patterns they had experienced in their lifetime.
 
Miebach’s work is multi-disciplinary, as she creates three-dimensional art from data collected from weather patterns and converts them into two-dimensional scores for musicians. After earning her bachelor’s degree from Oberlin University in Political Science and East Asian Studies.
 

Miebach was further inspired through her graduate work at Harvard University, where she combined her interests in art education, astronomy, and physics. Her musical interests are relatively new, as she seeks to bring a level of emotion to her work through the auditory senses.
 
Miebach’s work focuses on the intersection of art and science and the visual articulation of scientific observations. Using the methodologies and processes of both disciplines, she creatively translates scientific data related to astronomy, ecology and meteorology into woven sculptures. Central to this work is her desire to explore the role visual aesthetics play in the understanding of scientific information. 
 
By utilizing artistic processes and everyday materials, she questions and expands boundaries through which science data has been traditionally visually translated such as graphs and diagrams, while at the same time provoking expectations of what kind of visual vocabulary is considered to be in the domain of ‘science’ or ‘art.’
 
The program was sponsored by the CHS Visual Art and Environmental Science Departments. Teachers Margaret Holzer, Eric Hreha, Kiera Spadaro, and Candy Hull facilitated the day’s activities.