EAST BRUNSWICK, NJ - Mosquito control spraying will take place this evening beginning at 7:00 pm in the Welsh Park area of East Brunswick. (Click here for a map of the designated area.)  In addition to ongoing concerns about mosquitos in the summer, the West Nile Virus has been reported in New Jersey since 1999.  The current fogging protocol addresses this virus statewide.

The Middlesex County Mosquito Commission will apply the following adult mosquito control products will be applied from the ground by truck or handheld equipment and/or by aircraft, all using low volume (LV) or ultra-low volume (ULV) techniques:

Malathion​ (Fyfanon® ULV Mosquito) (Fact Sheet​)

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Etofenprox (Zenivex® E4 RTU) (Fact Sheet

Prallethrin - Sumithrin (Duet™ Dual-Action Adulticide​) (Fact Sheet​)

Deltamethrin (DeltaGard®) (Fact Sheet)

 

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) & Rutgers University has approved and recommended these mosquito control products for residential mosquito control and considers them to pose no unreasonable health risk when applied according to label directions.  The Commission has notified municipal officials, health officers and police of these plans.  Neither the USEPA nor NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) requires relocating or taking special precautions during spraying with this product. All applications will be according to product labeling.

Some concern has been expressed by Theresa Lam, local organic farmer and bee-keeper,  about the specific use of the pesticide Zenivex and its impact on local bees. While Zenivex is toxic to bees, fogging is done late at night (usually starting around 11 pm) when most mosquitoes are flying, and bees are not active. This practice matches the EPA’s guidelines on usage of Zenivex.  According to the EPA report, timing is key in the application of Zenivex, so the late-night fogging is essential to the maintenance of bees.  Lam suggests, "f this was being done in my immediate area I would need to cover my hives with wet sheets to protect them."

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Residents can take following precautions to reduce exposure: 

  • Plan your activities to limit time spent outside during times of possible insecticide treatments. Move your pets, their food, and water dishes inside during ULV application. Also bring clothing and children’s toys inside. Stay away from application equipment, whether in use or not. ​
  • Whenever possible, remain indoors with windows closed and with window air conditioners on non-vent (closed to the outside air) and window fans turned off during spraying. 
  • Avoid direct contact with surfaces that are still wet from pesticide spraying.  Do not allow children to play in areas that have been sprayed until they have completely dried (approximately one hour). 
  • If you must remain outdoors, avoid eye and skin contact with the spray.  If you get spray in your eyes or on your skin, immediately flush and rinse with water.

If residents wish further information, they can contact their local health department or call the National Pesticide Information Center 1.800.858.7378 or visit their website at the following link: http://npic.orst.edu.  The Commission (732-549-0665) operates a message machine 24 hours a day/7 days a week for individuals who cannot call during our working hours, 7:00 AM to 3:30 PM.