Bill Would Protect Intramural High School Players with Concussions

Assemblyman John DiMaio Credits: courtesy photo

TRENTON, NJ - Gov. Chris Christie signed a bill that expands concussion precautions for high school students, and was introduced by Rep. John DiMaio, R-23.

With the new bill, high school students who suffer a concussion during intramural sports will be protected by the state's student-athlete head injury safety program bill, according to a release.

The bill was signed Thursday.

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"High school-age students require more time to recover from a brain injury, and suffer more severe symptoms and neurological disturbances," DiMaio said in the release. "It is critical that students are fully recovered before returning to a normal daily regimen."

According to the release, the law adds intramural sports to the law that already requires special head injury and concussion diagnosis and treatment training for school physicians, coaches and trainers.

The CDC, the release said, has estimated that 1.6 million to 3.8 million concussions occur every year, and as many as 30 percent are sports related. About 10 percent of athletes, the release said, experience concussions during any given sport season.

According to the release, football players have a 75 percent chance of concussion, and female soccer players have a 50 percent chance of a brain injury.

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