EAST AMWELL, NJ - Hannah Sjostrom, the 2019 American Honey Queen, will visit the Hunterdon County 4-H and Agricultural Fair here. She will be a guest of the Northwest New Jersey Beekeepers Association and will appear at its exhibit at the Fair, which runs Wednesday through Sunday, Aug. 21 to Aug. 25.

Hannah will speak to fairgoers about the importance of honeybees to the public’s daily lives and how honeybee pollination connects our diverse society. She will also speak about the food value of honey and give demonstrations.

Past American honey queen and princesses during their time at the Fair have entered a cage with filled with bees and she is likely to do the same.

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Her visit was arranged by Fran Wasitowski of Raritan Township on behalf of the association.

Queen Hannah is the 21-year-old daughter of Douglas and Kim Sjostrom of Maiden Rock, Wisc. She is a junior at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, studying nursing. She is a third-generation beekeeper, following in the footsteps of her father and grandfather, Edwin.

As the Honey Queen, Hannah serves as a spokesperson on behalf of the American Beekeeping Federation, an organization representing beekeepers and honey producers throughout the United States. The American Honey Queen and the Princess, another member of beekeepers' royalty, speak and promote in venues all over the country, and, as such Queen Hannah is traveling throughout the United States this year. She served as the 2018 Wisconsin Honey Queen. In this role, she promoted the honey industry at fairs, festivals, and farmers’ markets, via media interviews, and in schools.

According to the federation, the beekeeping industry touches the lives of every individual in our country. Honeybees are responsible for nearly one-third of our entire diet, because of the pollination services that they provide for a large majority of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes. This amounts to nearly $19 billion per year of direct value from honeybee pollination to United States agriculture, the group said.