Arts & Entertainment

Livingston Seeks to Expand Committee Considering Renovation of Community’s Pools

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LIVINGSTON, NJ – As thousands of people continue to enjoy Livingston’s two community pools this summer, members of the Livingston Township Council are considering an expansion of the committee that will make recommendations for the best way to renovate and revamp them.

The council conducted a preliminary discussion in the spring focused on determining the best future for the Haines and Northland pools, both of which are in desperate need of both cosmetic and infrastructural renovations, according to the council. At Monday’s council meeting, Mayor Shawn Klein outlined the many items that the new Pool Committee would address.

Discussion topics will include the pros and cons of keeping both pools, which would cost the township an estimated $10 million to fully repair and upgrade, or to eliminate one complex in order to fully renovate the other to meet all needs.

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According to the mayor, other issues the committee will review include ways to expand membership, possibly working with partner agencies to offer other pool options, and what else the land could be used for if either the Northland or Haines pool is sold.

Deputy Mayor Ed Meinhardt was among the council members who expressed a desire to expand the Pool Committee, which currently has 11 members serving on it. This includes seven Livingston residents and four Livingston employees and is being chaired by Shari Stark.

“We need to have all age groups represented, which is not the case now,” said Meinhardt. “We especially need people in the 20 to 45-year-old range who use the pool.”

Meinhardt also recommended adding people who recently moved into the township.

Klein agreed that this was an excellent idea, and added that a realtor should also be asked to serve on the committee.

“Realtors use our community pools as a selling point for people to buy homes in Livingston,” said Klein. “A realtor would add a valuable perspective to this committee.”

The council members agreed that more people will be asked to serve on the Pool Committee, which is now beginning to review business-related issues such as retrieving the most accurate figures on the cost of operating the pools, membership revenue, which pool gets more usage, and current repair costs. 

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