Middletown, N.J. – Assemblyman Gerry Scharfenberger (R-Monmouth) has introduced legislation, bill A4659, which seeks to reinforce parental and guardian rights as it pertains to children receiving mandated yearly influenza immunizations or “seasonal flu shots:”

“Parents of New Jersey, given the proper facts, are best suited to make health decisions for themselves and their families, especially for their children,” says Scharfenberger. “Medical decisions, whether they involve diagnosis, treatment, or preventative measures, are highly personal and should remain such.”

Bill A4659 comes at a key time as officials in Trenton are considering making seasonal flu immunization shots mandatory for school-aged children. Assemblyman Scharfenberger’s legislation seeks to prevent such and leave the ultimate choice of whether children should or should not receive flu shots at the rightful hands of parents, guardians, and medical professionals – not politicians:

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“Government’s role should be limited to making sure that all information and related recommendations are available to everyone to help in making informed decisions in conjunction with advice from medical professionals,” Scharfenberger continued. “Trenton, and government in general, has a nasty habit of infringing on personal choice under the guise that they ‘know better’ – when history paints a much different picture.”

The legislation introduced by Assemblyman Scharfenberger does not attack the validity or value of immunizations or even the flu shot in general; however, it does combat the notion of government infringement which continues to chip away at parental responsibilities and personal choice:

“Regarding personal medical decisions, there is no room for government to dictate which course of action parents should be take, or whether any course of action be taken at all,” Scharfenberger concluded. “People should have the right to make their own decisions regarding medical procedures and preventative care, not some bureaucrats in Trenton.”