WESTFIELD, NJ — Back in May, Westfield made national news over a controversial “Police Brutality” art exhibit at the high school. This week, Westfield is all the talk once more, this time over “creepy” letters that the owners of a home on Boulevard said they received just after buying it in June for more than $1.3 million. “People Magazine,” Good Morning America,” the “Today Show” and even British tabloids have featured stories about “The Watcher.”

Why is the world obsessed with the now infamous house?

“When an anonymous someone sends dark notes referring to your children as ‘young bloods,’ indicating that he will ‘call to them and draw them to me,’ as the lawsuit alleges, it's scary, particularly to parents,” said Chasing Jersey reporter Hank Flynn, one of  many members of the media converging in Westfield this week. “Our children represent our greatest vulnerabilities, and when we feel they are threatened and we're at a loss to respond, that feeling is what readers/viewers are relating to. That said, there’s a lot more to the story — all may not be as it seems.”

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What we know is this: The home’s new owners are suing the people who sold it to them because they say the sellers failed to disclose that it came with a stalker. The lawsuit says the family received three disturbing letters last summer signed “The Watcher.” The letters said that its author had been watching the house and its occupants “for the better part of two decades” and demanded “Stop changing it and let it alone.”

Another letter asked if they found what was in the walls yet. The author asks whose room will face the street, adding “It will help me knowing who is in which bedroom then I can plan better.”  

The lawsuit contends that the previous owners had also received a “disturbing” letter in May. (You can read the entire lawsuit on Gawker.)

At Tuesday’s town council meeting, Mayor Andy Skibitsky told news crews and reporters gathered there that Westfield police began investigating the letters last year and that “no stone was left unturned,” though he would not comment if the police had a subject in the case.

Flynn questioned the existence of the letters and wondered what results the investigation has yielded.

“There are many more questions, but the suit attaches a certain degree of claimed ‘ownership’ to the ‘Watcher,’ who's a defendant in the suit, despite the fact that no one knows who he is,” said Flynn. “That implied ownership seems to be the legal leverage that the plaintiff is depending on to get them out of a 1.3 million dollar deal. And there's a lot more.”

As the world continues to speculate, the mayor has urged anyone with additional facts or information relating to this matter to contact Westfield police at 908-789-4000.