ROBBINSVILLE, NJ – Montclair’s Gilbert Gibbs, best known as the coach to establish the first lacrosse Dynasty in New Jersey, will be inducted into the NJSIAA (New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association) Bollinger Hall of Fame's class of 2014. 

Gibbs will be inducted alongside several NFL players, including Bruce Taylor, the 1970 San Francisco 49ers first-round draft pick. Eight Garden State sports achievers will be recognized during the induction ceremony that takes place on December 1 at the Pines Manor in Edison, NJ.

Born and raised in Montclair, Gibbs was a 1957 graduate of Montclair High School. After graduating Springfield College in 1951, Gibbs spent 13 years as a Montclair High school Physical Education teacher and lacrosse coach. In 1966 he took over a fledging lacrosse team and brought it to national acclaim 11 years later. Gibbs established lacrosse at Montclair High School as the first successful program of its kind in New Jersey,earning 11 state championships.

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During the early years of Lacrosse in Montclair, games were played at Anderson Field. Under his leadership, Montclair’s lacrosse team earned an incomparable 177-35 record.

On July 22, 1978, at age 39, Gibbs passed away after a two-year battle with cancer. In 1997, Gibbs was posthumously inducted into the national Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

The eight 2014 NJSIAA inductees include:

·         Gilbert Gibbs established the 1st New Jersey high school lacrosse dynasty. During his 13 years as Montclair’s lacrosse coach, his record was 177-35 with 7 state titles and during his final nine seasons his record was 144-10, a 94 percent winning rate. Today, Gibbs is recognized as a pioneer in the growing sport of lacrosse in New Jersey.

·         Scotch Plains’ Fanwood High School three-sport athlete – football, basketball and track – William “Billy” Austin received a full scholarship to Rutgers University. In 1957 and 1958 he received honorable mention All-American lacrosse team and in 1958 he received Collegiate 1st Team All-American running back. A year later Austin was drafted into the NFL by the Washington Redskins.

·         Miller Bugliari – head soccer coach at Pingry since 1960 – is the national record holder for most victories as high school coach, which he set back in 2009 after his 714th win. He recently received his 800th victory on September 16. Bugliari has coached 18 undefeated seasons and has been a longtime inductee into the Pingry Hall of Fame.

·         Gil Chapman attended Elizabeth’s Thomas Jefferson High School and played football under NJSIAA Hall of Fame coach, Frank Cicarell. In 1970 the team went undefeated and Chapman was named Parade Magazine’s "Number 1 Player in America." Three years in a row – from 1968-70 – Chapman was the lead scorer in NJ with a total of 514 points and the Star-Ledger named him 1st Team All-State all three years. Chapman received a scholarship to University of Michigan and went on to play for the New Orleans’ Saints during the 1975 NFL season.

·         Wheelchair track and field athlete, Jessica Michelle Cloy, nee: Galli, was injured in a car accident at age seven. She participated in both fall and spring track during her four years at Hillsborough High School. At the Meet of Champions from 1998-2002 she set and reset the four state records in the 100 meter, 400 meter, 800 meter, and 1600 meter and held those records until 2012. In 1998 – at the age of 14 – Cloy competed in her first international event, the IPC World Championships in Birmingham, England, and has been competing internationally ever since.

·         Rich Giallella held a number of roles over the years including teacher, coach, administrator, athletic director and high school and college basketball official. He was the varsity baseball coach at Steinert High School for 18 years, compiling an overall record of 401 victories and five baseball state tournament championships from 1992-2000. The Star-Ledger named Giallella Coach of the Decade for the 1990’s.

·         Varsity baseball athlete at Haddonfield High School from 1945-49, Joseph Hartmann, led his team to a Colonial League championship in 1949. He went on to establish the South Jersey Baseball Coaches Association (SJBCA) in 1974 and has served as president ever since. He has also been a member of the New Jersey State Baseball Coaches Association since 1972 (41 years). Hartmann is by far considered the “dean” of south Jersey baseball coaches.

·         Football star at Perth Amboy High School, Bruce Taylor, was named the Star-Ledger football “All Decade Team” for the 1960s and the 1st Team All-State in 1966. Taylor went on to play at Boston University in 1969, where he led the nation in punt returns and was named 1st Team All-American. In 1970 he was the San Francisco 49ers 1st round NFL draft pick, where he played his entire eight-year career.

Established in 1995 and named for Short Hills-based sponsor Bollinger Insurance, a provider of sports-related insurance products, the NJSIAA’s Bollinger Hall of Fame receives nominations annually from high schools across the state. These submissions are reviewed by a selection committee that makes final decisions regarding inductees.

Additional details – including specific criteria and the nomination form – are available by visiting http://goo.gl/PBwIBj.

About the NJSIAA

Established in 1918, the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) is a voluntary, non-profit organization comprised of 433 accredited public, private, and parochial high schools. A member of the National Federation of State High School Associations, the NJSIAA conducts tournaments and crowns champions in 32 sports. Championship competition for girls is sponsored in basketball, bowling, cross country, fencing, field hockey, golf, gymnastics, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, outdoor track, winter track, and volleyball. Boys’ championships are determined in baseball, basketball, bowling, cross country, fencing, football, golf, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, outdoor track, winter track, volleyball, and wrestling.