NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ - Believe it or not, we’re living through history right now. That’s why the Rutgers University Libraries want to collect artifacts and memorabilia from the present day.

If you took part in yesterday's women's march in Morristown, or one of the "sister" marches across the state, you should consider donating your signs and protest memorabilia to Rutgers - for future historians.

Any donated items will be part of the library’s Women's March Archive Project, part of Rutgers’ Special Collections and University Archives and aimed at documenting these materials for future scholars.

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“Last year, we collected signs, buttons, pamphlets, newspapers, stickers and one embroidered goose patch from Women’s March Participants,” reads a statement from library officials.

Any donated items will be part of the library’s Women's March Archive Project, aimed at documenting these materials for future scholars.

Yesterday, 4,000 protestors in Morristown, marched from town hall to the Morristown Green. Gov. Phil Murphy and his wife, Tammy Murphy, who praised the #MeToo movement and admitted for the first time publicly that she was the victim of sexual assault while a sophomore in college.  

Last year during the week of President Donald Trump’s inauguration, over 7,000 protesters attended a similar march in Trenton and upwards of 2,000 Rutgers students marched through the College Avenue Campus and down the streets of New Brunswick.

Those who want to donate their signs or other memorabilia can contact Rutgers' Special Collections and University Archives at 848-932-7510 or email scua_ref@libraries.rutgers.edu.