Researchers aiming to identify lifestyle factors related to weight management followed more than 4,500 young adults (average age 24) for ten years. At the end of the study period, 77% of the men and 72% of the women had gained weight. The lifestyle factors associated with no weight gain among the remaining 23% of the men and 28% of women were regular eating patterns (not skipping meals) and no history of dieting. The results of this study were published in the April 2018 issue of the journal Eating Behaviors.

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1471015317302295
Medical News Today discussion: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321324.php

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Looking at the result of this study, the people who dieted and skipped meals gained weight. So, if you want to gain weight go on a diet!

Here’s why - when calorie intake (from dieting and/or skipping meals) falls below the amount needed to maintain vital functions (heart beating, lungs breathing, kidneys flushing, brain thinking, etc.) the body interprets this as a famine situation. To protect you from starvation, your metabolism slows and you become great at storing energy (calories), i.e. accumulating fat.

So, when you go “off” the diet and go back to your regular eating habits, you’re putting more calories into a body that is slowed down and in fat storage mode. What usually happens is that you gain back everything you lost and a little extra, too.

From the research reported on above – if you want to avoid gaining weight, don’t diet and don’t skip meals. You should eat enough calories to maintain your vital body functions and support exercise/activity. To learn what your caloric needs are, use the calculator at this link: https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-2/

Following are some guidelines adapted from the Medical Center at the University of California at San Francisco  and suggestions to help you avoid weight gain:

Aim to eliminate sugary, non-nutritious foods, such as:

Sugar, honey, syrups, and candy
Pastries, donuts, pies, cakes, and cookies
Soft drinks, sweetened juices, and alcoholic beverages

Instead choose:
fresh or frozen fruits
unsweetened plain or herbal teas
plain or flavored seltzers

Limit high fat and processed foods such as:

Cream-based dressings and soups
Bacon, sausage, hot dogs, deli meats (except occasional turkey breast, chicken breast and lean roast beef)
Full fat dairy products
Chips and dips
Fried foods
Instead choose:

chicken, turkey, lean beef, fish, and beans
low-fat or non-fat dairy products
vinaigrette or olive oil and vinegar, herbs, or lemon-based dressings
oven fried, roasted or sautéed vegetables
less butter, margarine, oil, and mayonnaise
low-fat cooking methods, such as baking, broiling, steaming, grilling and boiling

Eat a variety of foods such as:

Fresh or frozen vegetables that are raw, steamed, baked or roasted
Fresh or frozen unsweetened fruits
Whole grain cereals, breads, pasta, rice, quinoa, lentils, beans

Change your habits to include:

Eating smaller portions
Eating three balanced meals a day
Eating only when hungry and stopping before feeling full
Eating slowly and waiting 15 minutes before reaching for second helpings
Eating mindfully and not performing other tasks while eating
Walking more, sitting less 
NOT DIETING!

For more information see:

US Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020
Estimate caloric needs
https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-2/

USDA
Interested in Losing Weight
https://www.nutrition.gov/weight-management/strategies-success/interested-losing-weight

American Heart Association
Losing Weight
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/WeightManagement/LosingWeight/Losing-Weight_UCM_307904_Article.jsp#.WsaNbZch3IU

Researchers aiming to identity lifestyle factors related to weight management followed more than 4500 young adults (average age 24) for over ten years. At the end of the study, 23% of the men and 28% of the women had maintained their weight. The ability to avoid gaining weight gained was associated with regular eating patterns (not skipping meals) and no history of dieting. The results of this study were published in the April 2018 issue of the journal Eating Behaviors.

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1471015317302295
Medical News Today discussion: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321324.php

 Use this news

Looking at the result of this study, the people who dieted and skipped meals gained weight. So, if you want to gain weight go on a diet!

Here’s why - when we restrict our calorie intake (by dieting and/or skipping meals) below the amount needed to maintain our vital functions (heart beating, lungs breathing, kidney’s flushing, brains thinking, etc.) our bodies interpret the reduction in food as a famine situation. To protect us from starvation, our metabolism slows and we become great at storing energy (calories), i.e. accumulating fat.

So at some point, when we go “off” the diet or stop skipping meals, and go back to our regular eating habits, we’re putting more calories into a body that is slowed down and in storage mode. What usually happens is that you not only gain back everything you lost, but a little extra, too.

From the research reported on above – if you want to avoid gaining weight, don’t diet and don’t skip meals. You should eat enough calories to maintain your vital body functions and exercise/activity. To learn what your caloric needs are, use the calculator at this link: https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-2/

Following are some guidelines adapted from the Medical Center at the University of California at San Francisco  and suggestions to help you avoid weight gain:

Aim to eliminate sugary, non-nutritious foods, such as:

  • Sugar, honey, syrups and candy
  • Pastries, donuts, pies, cakes and cookies
  • Soft drinks, sweetened juices and alcoholic beverages

                Instead choose:
                            fresh or frozen fruits
                            unsweetened plain or herbal teas
                            plain or flavored seltzers

Limit high fat and processed foods such as:

  • Cream based dressings and soups
  • Bacon, sausage, hot dogs, deli meats (except occasional turkey breast, chicken breast and lean roast beef)
  • Full fat dairy products
  • Chips and dips
  • Fried foods
  • Chicken, turkey, fish and beans (legumes)

                Instead choose:

  • chicken, turkey, lean beef, fish, and beans
  • low-fat or non-fat dairy products
  • vinaigrette or olive oil and vinegar, herbs, or lemon based dressings
  • oven fried, roasted or sautéed vegetables
  • less butter, margarine, oil and mayonnaise
  • low-fat cooking methods, such as baking, broiling, steaming, grilling and boiling

Eat a variety of foods such as:

  • Fresh or frozen vegetables that are raw, steamed, baked or roasted
  • Fresh or frozen fruits
  • Whole grain cereals, breads, pasta, rice, quinoa, lentils, beans

Change your habits to include:

  • Eating smaller portions
  • Eating three balanced meals a day
  • Eating only when hungry and stopping before feeling full
  • Eating slowly and waiting 15 minutes before reaching for second helpings
  • Eating mindfully, not performing other tasks while eating
  • Walking more, sitting less 
  • NOT DIETING!

For more information see:

US Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020
Estimate caloric needs
https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-2/

 

USDA
Interested in Losing Weight
https://www.nutrition.gov/weight-management/strategies-success/interested-losing-weight

 

American Heart Association
Losing Weight
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/WeightManagement/LosingWeight/Losing-Weight_UCM_307904_Article.jsp#.WsaNbZch3IU