Government

New Brunswick Proposes Pay Raise for City Council

The New Brunswick City Council has proposed pay increases for its members.

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ — City Council members could receive a raise that would increase their pay by thousands of dollars over the next several years.

New Brunswick’s governing body introduced an ordinance to establish the rising pay scale last night during its Feb. 15 meeting. Before the council votes on the measure, residents may speak about the proposal at the council’s 6:30 p.m. March 1 meeting in City Hall.

“If we did a cost-of-living analysis,” Council President Glen Fleming told TAPinto New Brunswick tonight, “most people would think it would be fair.”

Sign Up for E-News

Holding a council seat is not considered a full-time job. The council president currently makes $9,500 per year, according to municipal code. Individual council members each make $9,000 per year.

Those pay rates have been in place since July 1997, according to New Brunswick’s municipal code.

If the proposed ordinance is adopted, the council president would earn $11,000 in 2017, for an increase of $1,500. That number would rise to $12,500 in 2019 and $14,000 in 2021, according to the ordinance.

Four years from now, the council president’s pay hike would equal $4,500. That’s an increase of roughly 47 percent from the current pay.

If the proposed ordinance is adopted, council members would each earn $10,500 in 2017, for an increase of $1,500. By 2019, that figure would rise to $12,000 and then to $13,500 in 2021, according to the ordinance.

The final raise would also boost council members’ pay by $4,500. That represents a 50 percent increase above their current pay.

“I didn’t get on the council, and I didn’t run for office to try to make money or enrich myself,” Fleming said in a phone call. “But we sacrifice a lot.”

Fleming noted that council members often work for New Brunswick outside of public meetings, fielding calls from residents and attending events. He said the officials also spend money on gas to travel to various obligations.

The proposed pay hike came about “organically,” Fleming said, adding that it has “been in the works for a while.”

Council members declined to discuss the proposed pay raise during this week’s public meeting. One resident who spoke took issue with the measure.

“There are some people who are going to complain about everything,” Fleming later told TAPinto New Brunswick. “We’re not asking for Newark money.”

Council members in Newark reportedly make close to $100,000 per year and receive perks like city cars.

But council members in Perth Amboy reportedly earn $10,000 per year. That city’s council president, meanwhile, makes $12,000. Woodbridge’s council president and council members reportedly earn less than $10,000 per year.

In neighboring Edison, the governing body last year approved pay hikes that give the council president a maximum of $13,000 per year and council members $12,000 per year.

New Brunswick's mayor, Jim Cahill, has earned $40,000 annually since he was elected in 1991. This ordinance would not affect his annual pay, which he receives for a job that is considered part-time.

TAP Into Another Town's News:

You May Also Like

Sign Up for E-News

New Brunswick

Upcoming Events

Sun, April 23

Sri Guruvaayoorappan Temple, Morganville

Indian Carnatic Music Festival This Weekend

Arts & Entertainment

Sun, April 23, 3:00 PM

State Theatre New Jersey, New Brunswick

Ella & Louis with the NJSO ...

Arts & Entertainment

Sat, April 29, 10:00 AM

Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers, N=new Brunswick

Rutgers Day - Zimmerli Activities

Arts & Entertainment

Protest or Problem? Rutgers Revises Its “Disruption” Policy

April 17, 2017

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ — Rutgers University has shored up policy language so that community members and administrators alike may better understand the line between a protest and disruption.

The Board of Governors approved two resolutions earlier this month defining what, exactly, constitutes a disturbance that violates Rutgers policy. Among other things, the revisions lay out a list of ...

Shake It: RU Dance Marathon Tops $1 Million Mark

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ — Two consecutive, 12-hour dance sessions weren’t exhausting enough to quiet the crowd.

Participants of this year’s Rutgers University Dance Marathon, squeezed into the Rutgers Athletic Center, roared with shouts and applause when they got the news: They broke the fundraising record for the event by raking in more than $1 million.

The party, which ...

Battling for Big 10 Success, Rutgers Approves $115 Million Practice Facility

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ — A sprawling new athletics practice facility is set to take root on Rutgers University’s Livingston Campus come fall 2019.

The Board of Governors approved the construction of the $115 million project yesterday, April 6, during its meeting in Winants Hall. If all goes as planned, it will yield a four-story, 125,000-square-foot practice facility for basketball, ...

OPINION

Letter: Endangered Species Act is Endangered

March 29, 2017

Dear Editor:

New Jersey Audubon is deeply concerned about ongoing efforts on Capitol Hill to undermine the Endangered Species Act – a law passed by near-unanimous, bi-partisan support in 1973 - which works to recover threatened and endangered species. 

The attempts to roll-back the Act, if successful, would gravely threaten our incredible wildlife across America. There is no ...

Enjoy a Weekend of Folk Music in Middlesex County

April 20, 2017

MIDDLESEX COUNTY, NJ - The Middlesex County Office of Culture and Heritage invites you to enjoy two free music programs during the weekend of May 6 and 7.

The first program, “Folk Music: The American Spirit,” is scheduled to take place from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 6 at the Lodge at Thompson Park, 1701 Perrineville Rd. in Monroe Township.

This unique ...

The New Brunswick Music Scene: A World of Solace, Friendship and No BS

April 23, 2017

Editor's note: This is the first in a regular series of columns by Amy Barenboim, a Rutgers University student who covers and provides commentary on local issues.

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ — There is another side to nightlife in New Brunswick that is devoid of frat parties, bar-hopping and anonymous one-night stands. Underneath those conventional festivities--literally--is a whole different ...