TRENTON, NJ — As the phased reopening of New Jersey continues amid the COVID-19 pandemic and warming weather, the Department of Environmental Protection reminds the public that controlling the mosquito population and risk for disease is more important than ever, Commissioner Catherine R. McCabe said.

With public health in the spotlight as a result of the pandemic, residents doing their part to eliminate potential breeding grounds for mosquitoes takes on added significance and bolsters the work of the New Jersey State Mosquito Control Commission. Moreover, a very mild winter and anticipated wet weather makes prevention efforts even more critical as mosquito season begins. Additionally, the American Mosquito Control Association has declared June 21-27 as National Mosquito Control Awareness Week.

The New Jersey State Mosquito Control Commission oversees several longstanding programs designed to provide state assistance directly to county mosquito-control programs,” Commissioner McCabe said. “This assistance helps counties deliver targeted, science-based and environmentally sound mosquito-control services to the public. But we also need the public’s help and urge people to eliminate from their properties areas of standing water where mosquitoes may breed.”

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New Jersey’s mosquito season has started early in recent years and has been exceedingly rainy and hot with warm temperatures extending well into the fall. During the 2018 and 2019 seasons, surveillance programs documented above-average mosquito populations and record-setting levels of West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis in mosquitoes.

“Vaccinated animals are much less likely to contract deadly diseases such as Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile virus,” Department of Agriculture Secretary Douglas Fisher said. “ We strongly encourage owners of livestock and pets to vaccinate their animals to help protect against diseases spread by mosquitoes. The State Mosquito Control Commission’s vital role is enhanced when health precautions are followed.”  

Testing has started for a variety of pathogens spread by mosquito bites, including Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile virus.