Bruce the Blog

October 12, 2018

  When Dr. Mack Scharmett was 50 years old, gas was 34 cents a gallon. An average car cost $3,000. When he was 20 years old, an average house cost $3,900. When the good doctor was 10 years old, the yo-yo was introduced. So was “Steamboat Willie,” a short film that marked the debut of ...

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Author’s Note: Mom + Pop Culture are a couple of real characters. They could be you and me. Or not. Every so often, I eavesdrop on their conversations. Let’s listen in on what he said and she said about “he said, she said.” MOM CULTURE: So, what do you think, Pop? POP CULTURE: About what, ...

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On the face of it, the conceit behind award-winning stage musical “Urinetown” seems absurd: Citizens are required to pay for the privilege of relieving themselves at public urinals. To baby boomers, charging people to use public restrooms is neither absurd nor unthinkable. True, there were no ...

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Yeston and Kopit’s ‘Phantom’ Westchester Broadway Theatre, 1 Broadway Plaza, Elmsford Ladies and gentlemen of the audience, in the never-ending battle of Art versus Commerce, consider Exhibit P: the two musical Phantoms. There is, but of course, Andrew Lloyd Webber’s record-breaking “Phantom of ...

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Almost every behavior can be sub-divided into being enacted by two kinds of people. Do I really believe that? Let’s put it this way. I have space on this page to fill every week. That requirement—self-mandated though it is—gets you to thinking about all sorts of unusual things. This is one of ...

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The bar scene was bustling noisily at Furci’s Italian Restaurant when one patron held up his hand to quiet the crowd: “Hey, everyone, here comes a sacred moment in television history.” On a TV screen high up in the corner, an episode was playing of “The Honeymooners.” Ed Norton, played by actor ...

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The names Larry Page and Sergey Brin may or may not mean anything to you. Odds are, though, you’ve heard of the company they started. The two were Ph.D students at Stanford University 22 years ago when they figured out a new and improved way to produce search results on the internet. They called it ...

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We take water for granted. Elizabeth Phelps Meyer does not. “Water is the first medicine,” she says. “We use it to heal, to cleanse, to live. We are disconnected from all this in our culture, but Native Americans are not.” When the visual arts educator and interdisciplinary artist became ...

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To a music lover scanning the list of American standards to be heard later this month at “Symphony at the Seashore” in Cape Cod, most of the composers are instantly recognizable. Who doesn’t know George Gershwin, or marching band maestro John Philip Sousa, or country music’s Lee Greenwood, or ...

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Every year in this season of diplomas and mortarboards, the local charity we host in memory of our son—Harrison Apar Field of Dreams Foundation—awards a scholarship to a high school senior whose well-rounded pursuit of excellence echoes Harrison’s. He was born with a rare form of dwarfism, but his ...

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I’m no fitness or wellness expert. I know just enough to try to keep my temple (see: body) out of trouble, health-wise. My day starts by popping six non-prescription pills (C, D3, E, low-dose aspirin, CoQ10, echinacea), and several prescribed pills. Other than fruit, I avoid sugar like the ...

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I’ve loved Broadway musicals since I was smaller than a piano bench. That’s one reason I enjoy writing about local productions in this space. The more people who go to musicals, the happier it makes me. I didn’t realize how old-fashioned about musicals I could be, though, until my wife Elyse and ...

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