EAST BRUNSWICK, NJ - At a meeting Thursday night, the East Brunswick board of Education unanimously approved a resolution to engage the East Brunswick Police department to place armed police officers at each school building in the district throughout the entire school day.  In a report released by superintendent Victor Valeski yesterday, township officials asserted that the move would  "insure the safety of our students and staff."

The armed police officers would supplement the district's already existing staff of 71 security officers- each of whom is a retired police officer - already in place at the school buildings.

"It is the Board of Education and the superintendent's commitment to take all necessary measures to insure that our students, staff, and visitors remain safe and secure in our schools," said Valeski in the report.

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The Superintendent  and the Board expressed gratitude to the East Brunswick Police Department for "its willingness to work collaboratively"

On Friday morning, says the report, a high school student was arrested and charged with making a terroristic threat based on an on-line posting.  a parent and a student brought the post to the attention of the district staff.  the student was immediately identified and brought to the main office by a security officer.  The EBPD questioned the student and then took him in custody.  He will be charged with making a terroristic threat, says the report. 

Valeski thanked the parent and the student who reported the posting and praised the swift action of the police officers: "As a community, we all have to work together to remain vigilant and work together."

Yesterday's incident in East Brunswick was not the only threatening situation in New Jersey.  As a result of online terroristic threats, the Nutley Public Schools were closed as officials worked together to improve security at the school buildings.

Online reaction on social media in response to the placement of armed officers in the East Brunswick Public Schools has been swift, with local postings calling for residents who disagree with the school policing program to attend the March 1 Board of Education meeting.  responses range from " guns don't belong in schools" to "bullets don't belong in students and teachers."

Nationwide, there has been a call for school walk-outs and anti-gun protests on various dates and locations.