Beth's Book Review

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca

a72aa4d3cf1df9ec74fb_Mrs._Sherlock.jpg
a72aa4d3cf1df9ec74fb_Mrs._Sherlock.jpg

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca (St. Martin's Press, 2016)

At the turn of the 20th century, the thrilling, fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, had captured the imaginations of both British and American readers. In those days, when sleuthing as a career was a relatively new venture, the idea of a woman detective was preposterous.

Grace Humiston, who is not generally recognized as an everyday hero in American jurisprudence, made the color black the new black during her long and prestigious career as one of only 1000 women lawyers in the United States in the early 20th century. However, Humiston, a woman of incredible will and fortitude, was so much more than a lawyer as Brad Ricca describes her in the compelling account entitled Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. Always garbed in black clothing, including wide-brimmed hats that shielded her face, Humanist honed her skills as lawyer-turned-detective to solve cases that were seemingly impossible to untangle. She became a beacon of hope for downtrodden immigrants and offered legal assistance to those who were wrongfully convicted of crimes that led to the death penalty.

Sign Up for E-News

The featured story of this fascinating read is Humiston's determination to find a young woman who had gone missing in New York City on February 13, 1917 and to bring relief to her grieving parents. Beautiful, eighteen year old Ruth Cruger had disappeared one winter afternoon after announcing to her sister that she was on her way to a machine shop to pick up a pair of skates that she had sharpened there. When Ruth had not returned as the afternoon shadows began to lengthen, her sister, Christina, started to panic. At first Christina rationalized that Ruth must have gone skating at a local rink, but as darkness fell, Christina called her older sister, Helen, who promptly went out in search of Ruth. When her endeavors to locate her sister proved futile, Helen called her father's partner in their oil business, who sent a telegram to her father directing he and his wife to return home immediately from a trip.

Although the police were notified immediately of Ruth's disappearance, and detectives were dispatched to interview the Cruger family the day after Ruth went missing, the police suggested that Ruth had eloped, rather than had been kidnapped. They never seemed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the investigation from the start.

Months later Grace Humiston, who had been working on another daunting death penalty case outside of the city, heard about Ruth's disappearance, she felt compelled to investigate, enlisting the aid of her partner, detective Julius J. Kron to help her solve the mystery of what had happened to the young woman. Humiston's investigation started at the Metropolitan Motorcycles shop, the last place where the last confirmed sighting of Ruth had been made. “Grace didn't know if Ruth Cruger was alive or dead, but she had a feeling that this place held the key to answering that question. She just didn't know how Grace was still wearing black, even in the summer.” (p.163)

Through a labyrinth of clues, Humiston and Kron followed up stories of alleged romantic alliances that Ruth had enjoyed, the possibility that she had been abducted and used in a white slavery ring, and a deep dig into the basement of a building to find the truth of what had happened to the teenager. Through it all, Humiston followed her instincts as a woman, and as a tenacious detective, to find the dark truth of what had happened to the missing girl.

Ricca intricately weaves the tale of the dauntless career of Grace Humiston, a woman of self-less intellect and character, who wound up being appointed as the first female U.S. District Attorney in history. Humiston also succeeded in becoming the first woman used by the New York Police Department as a consulting detective, which allowed Grace many opportunities to investigate cases that she wouldn't have had without her detective's shield.

Despite her incredible career, Humiston had all but disappeared from history. In the Author's Note at the book's end, Ricca explains how he came across America's first female detective. He writes, “A book of 1978 student essays designed to use crime to teach the research paper had an entry called 'Grace Humiston: The First Woman Detective,' by Tim McCarl. There are some great academic articles on Sunny Side by Randolph Boehm and others that have appeared in history publications. Grace's story appeared in an article by Karen Abbott on the Web site for Smithsonian Magazine and in a novel, Grace Humiston and the Vanishing, by Charles Kelly. I found her by chance when I stumbled onto her 1917 interview in the New York Sun while researching the Black Hand.” (p.368)

After his initial introduction to Grace Humiston, Ricca went on to solve the mystery of her incredible career, and the result is Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. With precision and intricately researched stories about Humiston's passion for justice, Ricca presents the modern audience with the story of a true pioneer in the field of justice for the downtrodden. The book is eye opening in that many of the social problems that are prominent in America today were issues going back to the early 20th century, including the abuse of immigrants as they land upon our shores, and the enslavement of young woman for sexual purposes. Grace Humiston was, indeed, a woman ahead of her times, but more importantly, she is a woman for all time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca (St. Martin's Press, 2016)

 

At the turn of the 20th century, the thrilling, fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, had captured the imaginations of both British and American readers. In those days, when sleuthing as a career was a relatively new venture, the idea of a woman detective was preposterous.

Grace Humiston, who is not generally recognized as an everyday hero in American jurisprudence, made the color black the new black during her long and prestigious career as one of only 1000 women lawyers in the United States in the early 20th century. However, Humiston, a woman of incredible will and fortitude, was so much more than a lawyer as Brad Ricca describes her in the compelling account entitled Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. Always garbed in black clothing, including wide-brimmed hats that shielded her face, Humanist honed her skills as lawyer-turned-detective to solve cases that were seemingly impossible to untangle. She became a beacon of hope for downtrodden immigrants and offered legal assistance to those who were wrongfully convicted of crimes that led to the death penalty.

The featured story of this fascinating read is Humiston's determination to find a young woman who had gone missing in New York City on February 13, 1917 and to bring relief to her grieving parents. Beautiful, eighteen year old Ruth Cruger had disappeared one winter afternoon after announcing to her sister that she was on her way to a machine shop to pick up a pair of skates that she had sharpened there. When Ruth had not returned as the afternoon shadows began to lengthen, her sister, Christina, started to panic. At first Christina rationalized that Ruth must have gone skating at a local rink, but as darkness fell, Christina called her older sister, Helen, who promptly went out in search of Ruth. When her endeavors to locate her sister proved futile, Helen called her father's partner in their oil business, who sent a telegram to her father directing he and his wife to return home immediately from a trip.

Although the police were notified immediately of Ruth's disappearance, and detectives were dispatched to interview the Cruger family the day after Ruth went missing, the police suggested that Ruth had eloped, rather than had been kidnapped. They never seemed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the investigation from the start.

Months later Grace Humiston, who had been working on another daunting death penalty case outside of the city, heard about Ruth's disappearance, she felt compelled to investigate, enlisting the aid of her partner, detective Julius J. Kron to help her solve the mystery of what had happened to the young woman. Humiston's investigation started at the Metropolitan Motorcycles shop, the last place where the last confirmed sighting of Ruth had been made. “Grace didn't know if Ruth Cruger was alive or dead, but she had a feeling that this place held the key to answering that question. She just didn't know how Grace was still wearing black, even in the summer.” (p.163)

Through a labyrinth of clues, Humiston and Kron followed up stories of alleged romantic alliances that Ruth had enjoyed, the possibility that she had been abducted and used in a white slavery ring, and a deep dig into the basement of a building to find the truth of what had happened to the teenager. Through it all, Humiston followed her instincts as a woman, and as a tenacious detective, to find the dark truth of what had happened to the missing girl.

Ricca intricately weaves the tale of the dauntless career of Grace Humiston, a woman of self-less intellect and character, who wound up being appointed as the first female U.S. District Attorney in history. Humiston also succeeded in becoming the first woman used by the New York Police Department as a consulting detective, which allowed Grace many opportunities to investigate cases that she wouldn't have had without her detective's shield.

Despite her incredible career, Humiston had all but disappeared from history. In the Author's Note at the book's end, Ricca explains how he came across America's first female detective. He writes, “A book of 1978 student essays designed to use crime to teach the research paper had an entry called 'Grace Humiston: The First Woman Detective,' by Tim McCarl. There are some great academic articles on Sunny Side by Randolph Boehm and others that have appeared in history publications. Grace's story appeared in an article by Karen Abbott on the Web site for Smithsonian Magazine and in a novel, Grace Humiston and the Vanishing, by Charles Kelly. I found her by chance when I stumbled onto her 1917 interview in the New York Sun while researching the Black Hand.” (p.368)

After his initial introduction to Grace Humiston, Ricca went on to solve the mystery of her incredible career, and the result is Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. With precision and intricately researched stories about Humiston's passion for justice, Ricca presents the modern audience with the story of a true pioneer in the field of justice for the downtrodden. The book is eye opening in that many of the social problems that are prominent in America today were issues going back to the early 20th century, including the abuse of immigrants as they land upon our shores, and the enslavement of young woman for sexual purposes. Grace Humiston was, indeed, a woman ahead of her times, but more importantly, she is a woman for all time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca (St. Martin's Press, 2016)

 

At the turn of the 20th century, the thrilling, fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, had captured the imaginations of both British and American readers. In those days, when sleuthing as a career was a relatively new venture, the idea of a woman detective was preposterous.

Grace Humiston, who is not generally recognized as an everyday hero in American jurisprudence, made the color black the new black during her long and prestigious career as one of only 1000 women lawyers in the United States in the early 20th century. However, Humiston, a woman of incredible will and fortitude, was so much more than a lawyer as Brad Ricca describes her in the compelling account entitled Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. Always garbed in black clothing, including wide-brimmed hats that shielded her face, Humanist honed her skills as lawyer-turned-detective to solve cases that were seemingly impossible to untangle. She became a beacon of hope for downtrodden immigrants and offered legal assistance to those who were wrongfully convicted of crimes that led to the death penalty.

The featured story of this fascinating read is Humiston's determination to find a young woman who had gone missing in New York City on February 13, 1917 and to bring relief to her grieving parents. Beautiful, eighteen year old Ruth Cruger had disappeared one winter afternoon after announcing to her sister that she was on her way to a machine shop to pick up a pair of skates that she had sharpened there. When Ruth had not returned as the afternoon shadows began to lengthen, her sister, Christina, started to panic. At first Christina rationalized that Ruth must have gone skating at a local rink, but as darkness fell, Christina called her older sister, Helen, who promptly went out in search of Ruth. When her endeavors to locate her sister proved futile, Helen called her father's partner in their oil business, who sent a telegram to her father directing he and his wife to return home immediately from a trip.

Although the police were notified immediately of Ruth's disappearance, and detectives were dispatched to interview the Cruger family the day after Ruth went missing, the police suggested that Ruth had eloped, rather than had been kidnapped. They never seemed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the investigation from the start.

Months later Grace Humiston, who had been working on another daunting death penalty case outside of the city, heard about Ruth's disappearance, she felt compelled to investigate, enlisting the aid of her partner, detective Julius J. Kron to help her solve the mystery of what had happened to the young woman. Humiston's investigation started at the Metropolitan Motorcycles shop, the last place where the last confirmed sighting of Ruth had been made. “Grace didn't know if Ruth Cruger was alive or dead, but she had a feeling that this place held the key to answering that question. She just didn't know how Grace was still wearing black, even in the summer.” (p.163)

Through a labyrinth of clues, Humiston and Kron followed up stories of alleged romantic alliances that Ruth had enjoyed, the possibility that she had been abducted and used in a white slavery ring, and a deep dig into the basement of a building to find the truth of what had happened to the teenager. Through it all, Humiston followed her instincts as a woman, and as a tenacious detective, to find the dark truth of what had happened to the missing girl.

Ricca intricately weaves the tale of the dauntless career of Grace Humiston, a woman of self-less intellect and character, who wound up being appointed as the first female U.S. District Attorney in history. Humiston also succeeded in becoming the first woman used by the New York Police Department as a consulting detective, which allowed Grace many opportunities to investigate cases that she wouldn't have had without her detective's shield.

Despite her incredible career, Humiston had all but disappeared from history. In the Author's Note at the book's end, Ricca explains how he came across America's first female detective. He writes, “A book of 1978 student essays designed to use crime to teach the research paper had an entry called 'Grace Humiston: The First Woman Detective,' by Tim McCarl. There are some great academic articles on Sunny Side by Randolph Boehm and others that have appeared in history publications. Grace's story appeared in an article by Karen Abbott on the Web site for Smithsonian Magazine and in a novel, Grace Humiston and the Vanishing, by Charles Kelly. I found her by chance when I stumbled onto her 1917 interview in the New York Sun while researching the Black Hand.” (p.368)

After his initial introduction to Grace Humiston, Ricca went on to solve the mystery of her incredible career, and the result is Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. With precision and intricately researched stories about Humiston's passion for justice, Ricca presents the modern audience with the story of a true pioneer in the field of justice for the downtrodden. The book is eye opening in that many of the social problems that are prominent in America today were issues going back to the early 20th century, including the abuse of immigrants as they land upon our shores, and the enslavement of young woman for sexual purposes. Grace Humiston was, indeed, a woman ahead of her times, but more importantly, she is a woman for all time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca (St. Martin's Press, 2016)

 

At the turn of the 20th century, the thrilling, fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, had captured the imaginations of both British and American readers. In those days, when sleuthing as a career was a relatively new venture, the idea of a woman detective was preposterous.

Grace Humiston, who is not generally recognized as an everyday hero in American jurisprudence, made the color black the new black during her long and prestigious career as one of only 1000 women lawyers in the United States in the early 20th century. However, Humiston, a woman of incredible will and fortitude, was so much more than a lawyer as Brad Ricca describes her in the compelling account entitled Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. Always garbed in black clothing, including wide-brimmed hats that shielded her face, Humanist honed her skills as lawyer-turned-detective to solve cases that were seemingly impossible to untangle. She became a beacon of hope for downtrodden immigrants and offered legal assistance to those who were wrongfully convicted of crimes that led to the death penalty.

The featured story of this fascinating read is Humiston's determination to find a young woman who had gone missing in New York City on February 13, 1917 and to bring relief to her grieving parents. Beautiful, eighteen year old Ruth Cruger had disappeared one winter afternoon after announcing to her sister that she was on her way to a machine shop to pick up a pair of skates that she had sharpened there. When Ruth had not returned as the afternoon shadows began to lengthen, her sister, Christina, started to panic. At first Christina rationalized that Ruth must have gone skating at a local rink, but as darkness fell, Christina called her older sister, Helen, who promptly went out in search of Ruth. When her endeavors to locate her sister proved futile, Helen called her father's partner in their oil business, who sent a telegram to her father directing he and his wife to return home immediately from a trip.

Although the police were notified immediately of Ruth's disappearance, and detectives were dispatched to interview the Cruger family the day after Ruth went missing, the police suggested that Ruth had eloped, rather than had been kidnapped. They never seemed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the investigation from the start.

Months later Grace Humiston, who had been working on another daunting death penalty case outside of the city, heard about Ruth's disappearance, she felt compelled to investigate, enlisting the aid of her partner, detective Julius J. Kron to help her solve the mystery of what had happened to the young woman. Humiston's investigation started at the Metropolitan Motorcycles shop, the last place where the last confirmed sighting of Ruth had been made. “Grace didn't know if Ruth Cruger was alive or dead, but she had a feeling that this place held the key to answering that question. She just didn't know how Grace was still wearing black, even in the summer.” (p.163)

Through a labyrinth of clues, Humiston and Kron followed up stories of alleged romantic alliances that Ruth had enjoyed, the possibility that she had been abducted and used in a white slavery ring, and a deep dig into the basement of a building to find the truth of what had happened to the teenager. Through it all, Humiston followed her instincts as a woman, and as a tenacious detective, to find the dark truth of what had happened to the missing girl.

Ricca intricately weaves the tale of the dauntless career of Grace Humiston, a woman of self-less intellect and character, who wound up being appointed as the first female U.S. District Attorney in history. Humiston also succeeded in becoming the first woman used by the New York Police Department as a consulting detective, which allowed Grace many opportunities to investigate cases that she wouldn't have had without her detective's shield.

Despite her incredible career, Humiston had all but disappeared from history. In the Author's Note at the book's end, Ricca explains how he came across America's first female detective. He writes, “A book of 1978 student essays designed to use crime to teach the research paper had an entry called 'Grace Humiston: The First Woman Detective,' by Tim McCarl. There are some great academic articles on Sunny Side by Randolph Boehm and others that have appeared in history publications. Grace's story appeared in an article by Karen Abbott on the Web site for Smithsonian Magazine and in a novel, Grace Humiston and the Vanishing, by Charles Kelly. I found her by chance when I stumbled onto her 1917 interview in the New York Sun while researching the Black Hand.” (p.368)

After his initial introduction to Grace Humiston, Ricca went on to solve the mystery of her incredible career, and the result is Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. With precision and intricately researched stories about Humiston's passion for justice, Ricca presents the modern audience with the story of a true pioneer in the field of justice for the downtrodden. The book is eye opening in that many of the social problems that are prominent in America today were issues going back to the early 20th century, including the abuse of immigrants as they land upon our shores, and the enslavement of young woman for sexual purposes. Grace Humiston was, indeed, a woman ahead of her times, but more importantly, she is a woman for all time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca (St. Martin's Press, 2016)

 

At the turn of the 20th century, the thrilling, fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, had captured the imaginations of both British and American readers. In those days, when sleuthing as a career was a relatively new venture, the idea of a woman detective was preposterous.

Grace Humiston, who is not generally recognized as an everyday hero in American jurisprudence, made the color black the new black during her long and prestigious career as one of only 1000 women lawyers in the United States in the early 20th century. However, Humiston, a woman of incredible will and fortitude, was so much more than a lawyer as Brad Ricca describes her in the compelling account entitled Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. Always garbed in black clothing, including wide-brimmed hats that shielded her face, Humanist honed her skills as lawyer-turned-detective to solve cases that were seemingly impossible to untangle. She became a beacon of hope for downtrodden immigrants and offered legal assistance to those who were wrongfully convicted of crimes that led to the death penalty.

The featured story of this fascinating read is Humiston's determination to find a young woman who had gone missing in New York City on February 13, 1917 and to bring relief to her grieving parents. Beautiful, eighteen year old Ruth Cruger had disappeared one winter afternoon after announcing to her sister that she was on her way to a machine shop to pick up a pair of skates that she had sharpened there. When Ruth had not returned as the afternoon shadows began to lengthen, her sister, Christina, started to panic. At first Christina rationalized that Ruth must have gone skating at a local rink, but as darkness fell, Christina called her older sister, Helen, who promptly went out in search of Ruth. When her endeavors to locate her sister proved futile, Helen called her father's partner in their oil business, who sent a telegram to her father directing he and his wife to return home immediately from a trip.

Although the police were notified immediately of Ruth's disappearance, and detectives were dispatched to interview the Cruger family the day after Ruth went missing, the police suggested that Ruth had eloped, rather than had been kidnapped. They never seemed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the investigation from the start.

Months later Grace Humiston, who had been working on another daunting death penalty case outside of the city, heard about Ruth's disappearance, she felt compelled to investigate, enlisting the aid of her partner, detective Julius J. Kron to help her solve the mystery of what had happened to the young woman. Humiston's investigation started at the Metropolitan Motorcycles shop, the last place where the last confirmed sighting of Ruth had been made. “Grace didn't know if Ruth Cruger was alive or dead, but she had a feeling that this place held the key to answering that question. She just didn't know how Grace was still wearing black, even in the summer.” (p.163)

Through a labyrinth of clues, Humiston and Kron followed up stories of alleged romantic alliances that Ruth had enjoyed, the possibility that she had been abducted and used in a white slavery ring, and a deep dig into the basement of a building to find the truth of what had happened to the teenager. Through it all, Humiston followed her instincts as a woman, and as a tenacious detective, to find the dark truth of what had happened to the missing girl.

Ricca intricately weaves the tale of the dauntless career of Grace Humiston, a woman of self-less intellect and character, who wound up being appointed as the first female U.S. District Attorney in history. Humiston also succeeded in becoming the first woman used by the New York Police Department as a consulting detective, which allowed Grace many opportunities to investigate cases that she wouldn't have had without her detective's shield.

Despite her incredible career, Humiston had all but disappeared from history. In the Author's Note at the book's end, Ricca explains how he came across America's first female detective. He writes, “A book of 1978 student essays designed to use crime to teach the research paper had an entry called 'Grace Humiston: The First Woman Detective,' by Tim McCarl. There are some great academic articles on Sunny Side by Randolph Boehm and others that have appeared in history publications. Grace's story appeared in an article by Karen Abbott on the Web site for Smithsonian Magazine and in a novel, Grace Humiston and the Vanishing, by Charles Kelly. I found her by chance when I stumbled onto her 1917 interview in the New York Sun while researching the Black Hand.” (p.368)

After his initial introduction to Grace Humiston, Ricca went on to solve the mystery of her incredible career, and the result is Mrs. Sherlock Holmes. With precision and intricately researched stories about Humiston's passion for justice, Ricca presents the modern audience with the story of a true pioneer in the field of justice for the downtrodden. The book is eye opening in that many of the social problems that are prominent in America today were issues going back to the early 20th century, including the abuse of immigrants as they land upon our shores, and the enslavement of young woman for sexual purposes. Grace Humiston was, indeed, a woman ahead of her times, but more importantly, she is a woman for all time.

 

 

 

 

 

Beth Moroney, former English teacher and administrator in the Edison Public School District, specialized in teaching Creative Writing and Journalism. Recently Moroney published Significant Anniversaries of Holocaust/Genocide Education and Human/Civil Rights, available through the New Jersey Commission on the Holocaust. A passionate reader, Moroney is known for recommending literature to students, teachers, parents, and the general public for over forty years. Moroney can be contacted at trackdak19@hotmail.com.

The opinions expressed herein are the writer's alone, and do not reflect the opinions of TAPinto.net or anyone who works for TAPinto.net. TAPinto.net is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the writer.

TAP Into Another Town's News:

You May Also Be Interested In

Sign Up for E-News

Plainfield

Upcoming Events

Carousel_image_e494ac4a13e4230208bf_holy_savior_academy

Tue, July 17, 5:00 PM

South Plainfield

Holy Savio Open House July 17th

Carousel_image_e494ac4a13e4230208bf_holy_savior_academy

Tue, July 17, 5:00 PM

South Plainfield

Holy Savior Open House July 17th

Carousel_image_80bba19bc9425dae48d7_thurs_movie_nights_2018

Thu, July 19, 8:30 PM

AristaCare at Norwood Terrace, Plainfield

Movie Night - To Sir, With Love

Arts & Entertainment

Award-Winning Senior Art Exhibited at Freeholders Gallery

July 13, 2018

The Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders is pleased to present a new exhibit of award winning artworks by local artists age 60 and up, now on display at the Freeholders Gallery through August 29. Each of the 13 works received first place honors in the countywide Senior Art Exhibit held earlier this summer in the Atrium at Liberty Hall in Union Township.

“Each in their own unique way, ...

Plainfield BOE Member on Naming of the New School

July 12, 2018

On Tuesday, June 19, 2018 – I, Carmencita Pile, an elected Plainfield School Board member presented this during the Plainfield School Board monthly business meeting to the public and to the board after being recognized by Plainfield School Board President Mr. Richard Wyatt.

On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 12:10PM an email was sent from the Plainfield School District's Postmaster that ...

West Orange Named New Jersey's "Nicest" Town by Reader's Digest

July 13, 2018

WEST ORANGE, NJ — On its latest list of “The Nicest Places in Places in Every State,” Reader’s Digest named the Township of West Orange as the nicest place in New Jersey for 2018.

According to the list, the nicest places in America embody kindness and cooperation. It states that in each of these towns, “locals help out neighbors and strangers alike—and ...

Mayor Mapp:  El Programa de Verano de los Jóvenes

July 8, 2018

El lunes, 9 de julio, nuevas caras alumbraran las oficinas de la Alcaldía. Nuestro Programa de Verano de los Jóvenes por fin comienza, y otra vez los empleados tendrán la oportunidad de ser mentores de un nuevo grupo de jóvenes.

El Programa de Verano de los Jóvenes corre por seis semanas todos los años y les da la oportunidad de empleo y experiencia a ...

Featured Business: Studio 15 Young Plainfield Entrepreneurs Expand Business Once More

“What you see behind me is a life-changing project for myself that I have been working on since January 2017, nearly two years, discreetly; not sharing much about it with anybody. I've had plenty of reasons to give up on this truck; I purchased it pretty much from the ground up from Rashine Mobile, another local city entrepreneur. The truck had no steering column, no computer; it ...

'Servant of Two Masters' exudes foolish fun

‘Servant of Two Masters’ makes for foolish, frivolous fun

By Liz Keill

MADISON, NJ –Carlo Goldoni’s “The Servant of Two Masters,” in a rousing translation and adaptation by Bonnie J. Monte, has the outdoor audience at The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey laughing and clapping all the way through.

The yearly production, held at the amphitheatre on the ...

Lucia, Lucia by Adriani Trigiani

Lucia, Lucia by Adriana Trigiani (Ballentine Books, 2003)

 

If a summer romance novel is what you are craving to read as you sit by the pool or beach, Adriana Trigiani's Lucia, Lucia is a perfect choice. Set in 1950 New York City, the novel is about a young woman, Lucia Sartori, who is determined to have a career and be able to support herself, an unusual choice for a girl who was ...

The Anatomy of Escape by Mike Blue

The Anatomy of Escape: An Unconventional Adventure by Mike Blue (Available on Amazon)

 

Imagine that you could just say, “Chuck it,” and walk away from the bonds that keep you tied to what Mike Blue, author of The Anatomy of Escape: An Unconventional Adventure, defines as the restrictive Work-Consume-Die cycle. To most of us, becoming what Blue terms “a ...

The Death of Koko the Gorilla

Koko's Kitten, Koko's Story, The Eduction of Koko all by Dr. Francine Patterson

 

Last night when I heard about the death of Koko, the lowland gorilla who was educated to communicate through American Sign Language by Dr. Francine Patterson, I went numb with grief. I have followed the life of Koko, her two gorilla companions, Michael and Ndume, as well as Dr. Patterson for forty ...

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn (William Morrow, 2018)

 

A friend, whose opinion on literature I respect greatly, reported to me recently that she had just finished reading A.J. Finn's debut novel, The Woman in the Window. Of it she said, “I wish I hadn't finished it,” which I interpreted to mean, “It was so good I'm sorry that I finished it.” ...

When the Men Go Off to War by Victoria Kelly

When the Men Go Off to War by Victoria Kelly (Naval Institute Press, 2015)

Victoria Kelly's first published volume of poetry, When the Men Go Off to War, is a wonder in that poems can be written so beautifully about the subject of war. Each poem is a jewel, polished and colorful, glittering with elegant imagery, and rich in emotional wallop. The book, divided into three sections, ...

The Queen of the Big Time by Adriana Trigiani (Ballentine Books, 2005)

            The Queen of the Big Time by Adriana Trigiani, a New York Times best selling author, was recommended to me by a young woman who actually came from the town of Roseto, Pennsylvania, the place where the novel is set. “The author did such a wonderful job of describing how the town actually is,” said the young lady.