ROXBURY, NJ – A former doctor, whose license was stripped in 2004 after a drug possession conviction, was practicing medicine in Roxbury and his boss knew it, authorities said Tuesday.

The former doctor, Paramjit Singh, was charged with one count of third-degree practicing medicine without a license, said Warren County Prosecutor Richard Burke. Singh was one of the staff at Medical Care Associates, Family Practice/Urgent Care on Route 10 in Succasunna.

The owner of Medical Care Associates, Family Practice/Urgent Care, Dr. Parminderjeet Sandhu, knew Singh was unlicensed but allowed him to see patients anyway, said Burke. The prosecutor said Sandhu, who “was aware that Paramjit Singh’s medical license had been suspended” but nevertheless “facilitated him in practicing medicine,” faces a charge of third-degree aiding or abetting another in practicing medicine without a valid license, Burke said.

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Both offenses are punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $75,000, said the prosecutor.

In addition to the Roxbury office, Medical Care Associates, Family Practice/Urgent Care has offices in Hackettstown and Washington Township.

Receptionists working at the Succasunna office today said they were unaware of the charges and said they would ask Sandhu to contact TAPinto Roxbury. This did not immediately happen.

Singh’s license to practice medicine was revoked in 2004 by the state Board of Medical Examiners. In doing so, the board said Singh was found guilty of aggravated possession of drugs in Columbiana County, Ohio.

It said he held a medical license in New Jersey from 1992 until 1995, but let it lapse.

“On or about Feb. 19, 2003, the Ohio Board (of Medical Examiners) issued an immediate suspension of Dr. Singh' s license to practice medicine in Ohio based on the criminal conviction,” said the revocation statement. “On or about July 9, 2003, the Ohio Board entered an Order permanently revoking his license to practice medicine in Ohio. The revocation was stayed and Dr. Singh's license was suspended for an indefinite period of not less than one (1) year.”

That same month, the West Virginia Board of Medical Examiners suspended Singh’s license to practice medicine because he failed to provide the required continuing medical education certification. The West Virginia board subsequently revoked Singh’s license based on his criminal conviction in Ohio.

“The criminal action in Ohio provides grounds for the New Jersey Board to take disciplinary action against Dr. Singh' s license to practice medicine and surgery in New Jersey, in that he has had his authority to practice medicine and surgery in Ohio and West Virginia suspended and revoked,” said the New Jersey board. “Dr. Singh's failure to submit his biennial renewal and the resulting lapsed license provide further grounds to automatically suspend his license to practice medicine and surgery in New Jersey.”

Burke said the arrests were the result of a joint investigation by his office, police in Roxbury, Hackettstown and Washington Township, State Police, the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office, the state division of Consumer Affairs and the FBI.

The prosecutor is asking people who were treated by Singh to call the prosecutor’s office at (908) 475-6643.

According to the Medical Care Associates, Family Practice/Urgent Care web page, Sandhu opened his Hackettstown office in 1986 as a solo practitioner “with a vision of creating a quality and compassionate medical practice” and saw the business grow to the point where he had to add “additional services and specialties.”

“Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Dr. Sandhu is trained to care for all general medical needs for adults and adolescents,” says the site. “He has been specializing in internal medicine for over 30 years.”

Sandhu graduated from Medical College & Hospital in Rohtak, India, an affiliate of the University of Maryland Medical Center, according to the website. The site says Sandhu completed his internal medicine residency from Maryland General Hospital, University Hospital in 1986.