Arts & Entertainment

Somers Author Revels in Post-published Bliss

Linda Spear introduces author Lars Bolin. Credits: Photo by Gabrielle Bilik
Fellow writers listen to Lars Bolin read a passage from his debut novel, "A Mindful Death." Credits: Photo by Gabrielle Bilik
Lars Bolin reading a passage from his debut book. Credits: Photo by Gabrielle Bilik
Lylian Bolin looks on as her father reads. Credits: Photo by Gabrielle Bilik

SOMERS, N.Y.--When The Somers Record last caught up with Lars Bolin, the international banker-turned-consultant/life coach, he was in the process of self-publishing his first suspense novel,  “A Mindful Death.”

In May he accomplished his goal, when his book was published in Sweden. Last week, he returned to the U.S., his former home of 28 years, for the U.S. launch of the book.

A progeny of Somers writing/editing dream team Linda and Jay Spear, who have been helping local writers publish for the last five years, Bolin made sure they were there to share in the special moment. 

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Spear hosts workshops for writers at the Somers Library and out of her home. Spear is a published writer herself, and Jay, an experienced editor, sees the groups through the editing and publishing process.

The duo attended the Sept. 28 book launch at  the Hudson House Inn in Cold Spring, whom part of the book is set. Family and friends, many of which are also authors, sipped wine and nibbled hors d’ouevres in the low light of the inn, during an intimate reading of a  passage from “A Mindful Death.” The audience seemed engrossed in the passage, because as Bolin read, they slowly returned their cups to the surface of the table, and stopped snacking, ensuring that theirs would not be the cracker snap to interrupt the moment. 
 

Bolin’s story begins when Harry Anderson, a photojournalist, stumbles upon a photograph of an Italian family circa 1945. His curiosity is piqued and, after doing some research, he discovers the family moved from Italy to France under mysterious circumstances during WWII. The story unfolds into an international suspense thriller that spans continents and generations.

Bolin said he enjoyed the process overall, and was pleased with how the book launch went. He plans to continue writing, and even gave those who attended the launch a sneak preview into the second installment of the Harry Anderson series: “A Swedish Chameleon” from which he read a passage. 

His daughter, Lylian, was able to take some time off from her job in New York City, and come up for the reading. Now in her early 20s, she looks back to when she and her sister Lynnea were living with their parents in Yorktown as kids. This was around 2001, when Bolin took some time off from his career in International Banking to be home with them.

Lylian said she and her sister are glad to share in an accomplishment of Bolin’s after so many years of him doing the same for them.

“This is something he’s always wanted to do,” she said. “So to see him here, reading it, is great.”
Enjoying the success of a dream he put on hold for so long, Bolin’s advice to others who might be doing the same is to “just do it.”
 

Bolin moved back to Sweden, where he lived for the first 28 years of his life, last year. Since 2006, he has maintained dual citizenship in Sweden and the U.S. and is currently living in Sweden where he has developed a success fuljob-coaching career. There, he conducts workshops and trains immigrants to assimilate into the Swedish work force.

More about the Bolin, and his novels can be found at http://www.amindfuldeath.com.

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