SOMERVILLE, NJ - Historical musician Linda Russell presents a musical illumination of the role of women’s lives in society from the 18th Century to the 19th Amendment on the grounds of the Wallace House, 71 Somerset St., Sunday, Sept. 27 at 2 p.m.

The free, outdoor concert by Russell, "A History of Women in Song," will focus on the 18th century through passage of the 19th Amendment. She will perform  broadsides, laments, murder ballads, love songs, parlor melodies and suffrage anthems that reflect the changing status of women in society.

Registration in advance is required. Leave name and number in party online at wallacedutch@dep.nj.gov or call (908) 725-1015.

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Those planning to attend should bring lawn chairs. Concert is weather permitting.  Attendees are required to wear face coverings and maintain social distancing.  

This program is sponsored by the Wallace House & Old Dutch Parsonage Association.

The Wallace House served as General George Washington's headquarters during the 1778-79 winter encampment of the Continental Army. 

The Old Dutch Parsonage was constructed in 1751 with funds from three Dutch Reformed Church congregations of the Raritan Valley. This two and one half story brick Georgian building was first occupied by the Reverend Mr. John Frelinghuysen and his family. While Frelinghuysen served the three congregations, he also tutored several young men in his home, preparing them for the seminary. He was succeeded by the Reverend Mr. Jacob Hardenbergh, one of the young men whom he had once tutored. Unlike his predecessor, Jacob Hardenbergh did not tutor students in his home. He was, however, interested in education. In 1766, Hardenbergh drafted, circulated, and submitted a petition to the Royal Government to establish a new "classical and divinity" school in the Colony of New Jersey. As a result of his efforts, Queen's College was chartered in the same year.

In 1785, Jacob Hardenbergh became the first President of Queen's College.

Both buildings are listed as United States and New Jersey Historic sites.