Outdoors

View Solar Eclipse at RVCC Planetarium

b291597b6de96db02203_sompixrvccsolareclipse.jpg
f14643368e57bb0cf672_sompixrvccsolareclipse2.jpg
b291597b6de96db02203_sompixrvccsolareclipse.jpg

 

BRANCHBURG NJ - The Raritan Valley Community College Planetarium is hosting a viewing of the Solar Eclipse on Monday, Aug.21, the first time in 99 years that the U.S. will experience a coast-to-coast total Solar Eclipse.

While the “Path of Totality” for complete viewing of the Solar Eclipse will run diagonally across the country from Oregon to South Carolina, New Jersey residents will see approximately 75 percent of the Sun covered by the Moon.

Sign Up for E-News

The free, safe viewing of the Solar Eclipse is from 1-4 p.m., at the RVCC Planetarium. Those attending will participate in the viewing outside the 3M Observatory, which is located next to the Planetarium.

The following safety information is provided by the National Space & Aeronautics Administration:

Looking directly at the Sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (totality), when the Moon entirely blocks the Sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewers.

Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun. To date four manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.

Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. Always supervise children using solar filters.

Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright Sun. After glancing at the Sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the Sun.

Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the Sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed Sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the Sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the Sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse.

A solar eclipse is one of nature’s grandest spectacles. By following these simple rules, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime.

Raritan Valley Community College’s main campus is located at 118 Lamington Road. For further information, visit www.raritanval.edu.

TAP Into Another Town's News:

You May Also Be Interested In

Sign Up for E-News

Somerville

AtlantiCast

AtlantiCast: Episode 12

On this week’s episode of AtlantiCast, decade of excellence makes headlines, as Atlantic Health’s place on Fortune Magazine’s 100 Best Companies to Work For List leads off the newest episode of AtlantiCast. Also on this week’s show, check out the newest “hybrid” operating room at Morristown Medical Center and find out how Atlantic Health is helping local ...

AtlantiCast Medical Minute: Atlantic Orthopedic Institute’s Scoliosis and Spinal Deformity Center

On this episode of the AtlantiCast Medical Minute, we’ll take you inside the Atlantic Orthopedic Institute’s Scoliosis and Spinal Deformity Center, with the center’s director, Jason Lowenstein, MD.

Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M7euCp86-c

AtlantiCast Episode 011

Breaking Atlantic Health System news on this week’s AtlantiCast! Plus, find out why Morristown Medical Center is one of the best hospitals in the nation when it comes to recovering from joint surgery, see the newest center for fighting brain cancer and an Atlantic Health System red-carpet premiere!

 

Assistance Available for Residents Denied Social Security Disability Benefits

February 21, 2018

SOMERVILLE, NJ – Somerset County residents who have been denied Social Security disability benefits may apply for a free consultation with an attorney from the Community Justice Center of Trenton.

The Somerset County Office on Aging and Disability Services is providing opportunities for eligible residents to meet an attorney at its office at 27 Warren St. in Somerville from 11:30 a.m. to ...