Health & Wellness

Cancer Survivors Celebrate Life at Overlook Medical Center with Laughter, Songs and a Few Tears

66c1251c9ade9ae8bdad_abf720b3a3e07c0bd6e4_image1-5.JPG
People who have been diagnosed with cancer, whether the diagnosis was made one day ago or many years earlier, were invited to pin a card with a blue ribbon on it to the Timeline of Life. Credits: Barbara Rybolt
2230192637e365226532_image2.JPG
A cancer survivor places her blue ribbon on the Timeline of Life. Credits: Barbara Rybolt
5816bdf40be8e8a79381_image3.JPG
Douglas Allen of Roselle Park has celebrated two more birthdays after his diagnosis. Credits: Barbara Rybolt
58da23cbf8c7e13dd4d2_image5.JPG
Songwriter John Manion shared his survivor story through music Credits: Barbara Rybolt
79c337afcbfeca1db7f4_image6.JPG
Dr. Lee Starker listens to song writer John Manion as he performs. Credits: Barbara Rybolt
66c1251c9ade9ae8bdad_abf720b3a3e07c0bd6e4_image1-5.JPG

SUMMIT, NJ - Cancer isn't a laughing matter. But, fill a room with cancer survivors, a couple of surgical oncologists, nurses, relatives and friends, be prepared to laugh a lot, hear some songs about the dread disease and even shed a few tears.

That's what happened when the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Overlook Medical Center held its annual National Cancer Survivor's Day Celebration and filled the Bouras Auditorium with survivors and their supporters.

In the end, the message people left with came from all the speakers and survivors, including last year's Survivor Speaker, "John," who is featured in "John's Story," a video advertisement that debuted June 4. It's a simple message, "Where you go for cancer care, matters!"

Sign Up for E-News

The first hour of the event was free-form. Guests helped themselves to all sorts of food provided by Overlook Food Service and renewed friendships with friends, many of whom them met while at the hospital, during chemotherapy sessions or, in some cases, at previous Survivor Day celebrations. There was a real sense of homecoming, complete with enthusiastic greetings, hugs and lots of catching up.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Lee Starker, a surgical oncologist at Overlook Medical Center, who looked over the crowd and called the turnout "impressive ... I am in utter awe and amazement at the number of people that are here today."

He acknowledged that "cancer is a word that, when heard, strikes fear and depression," in people.

In a deeply personal talk, Dr. Starker said his experience with cancer began when he was quite young. "My father fell ill. I remember him heading off to treatments and whispering to me, 'You are the man of the house.' I was seven," he said.

It was as if the room itself shuddered when he said that and everyone there seemed to reach back in their memory to a similarly difficult moment in their cancer journey.

Pausing from time to time to regain his composure, he told of seeing what the disease did to his father, "physically, emotionally and spiritually ... Like all of you, he pushed on, taking on the beast with amazing intestinal fortitude." Thanks to a radiation oncologist who oversaw his treatment, his father survived "his ordeal, like all of you, to become an amazing member of society," he said. His father, Dr. Paul Starker, is chairman of surgery at Overlook Medical Center.

Dr. Lee Starker said his experience has taught him, "We all have the same needs and wants ... You here today have identified the ultimate need and want for every person, which is to survive. On this Survivors Day, I ask you all to enjoy the moment, enjoy the ride. Congratulations on your amazing journey."

Songwriter John Manion, who was diagnosed nine months earlier with Ampullary cancer, shared his survivor story through music, beginning with a song that described how life can go wrong. He used a song about a road trip as a transition into his story, "The last year of life has been a road trip which ended up at Summit, Overlook. It's been a great ride," said Manion.  

A year ago, after a Memorial Day picnic that involved too many hot dogs and wine, he got ill and blamed it on the eating and drinking. He developed "heartburn that wouldn't go away," and started to turn yellow, which produced an initial diagnosis of hepatitis, he said.  That was tossed out after an ultrasound indicated he had a problem with his gallbladder. A blockage was found and he said he was "referred to a wonderful surgeon Marc Mandel and ended up having a Whipple procedure on Sept. 8." They removed his gallbladder, part of his pancreas and part of his stomach, but "I still didn't realize I had cancer," he said.

A couple of days later "Dr. Mandel came in and said I had cancer. "I cried. It was sort of my worst realization," he said.

While still in the hospital, he spoke to his sister and said, "I can't do the record or go to Europe," because of the cancer, and she replied, "'Not this year.'" That all changed when Dr. Mandel suggested "Maybe you can get something out of this. Maybe if we bring you your guitar," that will help.

It did. Manion said, "I was really struggling, trying to keep a good attitude." That’s when he realized "I had this scar," which is a bit like a roadmap and something most cancer patients have and "came up with the idea for a song about detours and scars." He wrote the song once he was back home in Jersey City, and said that the chorus, didn’t make any sense until he realized he would be singing the song and “you could be, too. This song is about us. This is a song for everyone here.”  

“It’s detours and scars, they’re falling from the stars. They catch you when you least expect and they turn you upside down, They spin your world around”

He sang “Detours and Scars” and several other of his own songs, not all of which were about cancer, at the Survivorship Celebration.

When he finished singing, he said, "I got through it and want to thank everyone at Summit Overlook. I've had nothing but great experiences here. ... I've walked away from this whole situation ... I realize we have to keep on keeping on."

The highlight of every Cancer Survivorship gathering at Overlook has been the Timeline of Life, on which survivors pin a card with a blue ribbon on it marking the number of years since their diagnosis, beginning with one month, moving up to 30 or more years. As each time period is called, survivors walk to the front where they are welcomed by nurses, staff members from the Cancer Center. Each survivor receives a boxed present and a flower. Doctors Starker and Mandel greeted each survivor, after which the survivors pinned their ribbons to the Timeline of Life.

Abe Berger of Summit, pinned his ribbon at 27 years, which he and his wife of 62 years Dorothy, credited to the treatment he received at Overlook. He had colon cancer and the surgery, which was performed by Dr. Paul Starker, was on May 21, 1990. "There have been no recurrences," she said.

Before the Survivorship Celebration ended, the audience watched the premiere of "John's Story," the new ad campaign for the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Overlook Medical Center. From the applause, the audience seemed to agree with John’s message, “Where you go for cancer care matters.”

 

TAP Into Another Town's News:

You May Also Be Interested In

Sign Up for E-News

Summit

Summit Police Blotter

May 29, 2018

5/15 - Sean M. Reidy, 52, of Summit was arrested on a contempt of court warrant out of Summit. Mr. Reidy was able to post bail and released with a pending court date.

5/18 - At 1615 hours a report was taken for a theft from a Springfield Avenue business. The incident occurred at approximately 1031 hours when a white female entered the business and removed a blue Ramy Brook Blouse from a rack.

Bridges Outreach: Miracles in Manhattan

June 17, 2018

Bridges Outreach: Miracles in Manhattan (and elsewhere)

My good friend Joan Olszewski reached out to me the other day to tell me the Friday, June 8, Bridges Outreach run to Manhattan needed volunteers, “Let’s go,” she said.  The lunches were provided by Pimco, a dedicated corporate sponsor of Bridges, so all we needed were some bodies and the love necessary to offer food ...

Video: Point View's Petrides Looks at Media M&As, Fed's Hike Strategy

Point View Wealth Management's Managing Director and Portfolio Manager, John Petrides, live on FOX Business AM discussing M&A in the media industry and the Fed's path to four hikes in 2018:

ptview.com/medias/tv-radio

​​​​​​For more than 25 years, Point View Wealth Management, Inc. has been working with families in Summit and beyond, providing customized portfolio ...

Maximizing Your Portfolio’s Returns -- Beware the Taxman

The old adage in the investment world is that it is not what you make, but what you keep that counts.  Investors often overlook the ultimate deflator of portfolio returns – the taxman. An astute global asset allocation should be the number one priority for investors.  However, there are preferred ways to distribute this asset allocation over the spectrum of taxable and ...

AtlantiCast

AtlantiCast: Episode 16

Summer is in the air, and the latest episode of AtlantiCast is ready to help you enjoy some fun outdoors while staying safe! This week’s episode opens with tips for sunscreen usage from Atlantic Health System’s Chief Medical and Academic Officer, Dr. Jan Schwarz-Miller. You’ll also learn about how Atlantic Health System is advancing the future of health care through ...

Video: In The Zone with Christa Anderson

A must watch for anyone considering renovations, here is a recent interview that I conducted -- on my HomeTowne TV Show called “Are You Ready for Life?” -- with Christa Anderson, City of Summit Zoning Officer, to discuss the nuances within the variance process.

I asked Christa to shed some insight into the approval process, explain why it’s necessary, and ...

Hello, Neighbors

Hi, Summit families!

My name is Betsy Stoeber and I’ve been the owner and director at the specialized learning center Brain Balance of Summit since 2011. I first encountered Brain Balance the year before we opened as a parent. My own son participated in our innovative program at the center in Norwalk, CT, to address a number of learning challenges.

Traveling there three times per week ...