Sports

NJSIAA Medical Advisory Committee Issues Series of Protocols to Fight Prescription Drug Abuse

6105fbcb13b32b09f0d8_9ab33161c790852572f7_3cd06be882e587b6e8a0_2036_470017949717631_59835515_n.jpg
6105fbcb13b32b09f0d8_9ab33161c790852572f7_3cd06be882e587b6e8a0_2036_470017949717631_59835515_n.jpg

SUMMIT, NJ - According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, 12 percent of male student-athletes and eight percent of female student athletes have been prescribed highly-addictive opioid class narcotics in the past 12 months. Separate studies show that 83 percent of all adolescents actually have unsupervised access to their own narcotics prescriptions.

In the face of an intensifying, nationwide epidemic of prescription medication abuse – which has struck particularly hard among scholastic athletes – the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Medical Advisory Committee has made multiple recommendations. According to the NJSIAA, few -- if any -- high school-level initiatives have ever taken such a comprehensive approach to the crisis.

The most frequently abused prescription medications are narcotic painkillers, which include Vicodin, Percocet, and OxyContin.

Sign Up for E-News

The Medical Advisory Committee, which includes representatives of NJSIAA member schools as well as experts in the field of healthcare and medicine, recommends the following nine protocols related to scholastic athletes and opioid abuse.  

  • Physicians should exercise extreme caution whenever considering opioid prescriptions for student-athletes.
  • In terms of prescriptions, the first option should be such non-narcotic alternatives as acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, salicylates, and non-medication treatments like cryotherapy and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation.
  • If opioids are prescribed, it should only be for acute injuries resulting in severe pain – and only for one week at a time, with no automatic refills.
  • All opioid prescriptions should be accompanied with detailed information on use, including specific warnings about abuse and addiction risks.
  • Opioid prescriptions should never be given directly to student-athletes, and should never be administered in an unsupervised manner.
  • Treating physicians and/or parents/guardians should notify the school nurse and/or athletic trainer about all opioid prescriptions.
  • Treating physicians should utilize a “contract” – to establish boundaries and behaviors – whenever prescribing opioids to student athletes.
  • Every school district needs to develop a specific, detailed policy addressing this issue.
  • School districts should implement drug monitoring programs, with an emphasis on identifying students who seem to exhibit signs of opioid abuse.

Responding to the NJSIAA Medical Advisory Committee recommendations, Summit Public Schools Superintendent June Chang said, "Anything which affects the health and wellness of our students is a top priority. We review our policies regularly to keep up-to-date with state and federal mandates. Our policies address substance abuse at all levels and we continue to put measures in place to through our BOE Policy Committee to help provide assistance and safety to our students."

“When it comes to our nation’s young people, this is about as serious as a problem can get,” said Steve Timko, executive director of the NJSIAA, a voluntary, non-profit organization that oversees scholastic sports across New Jersey. “Lives are being ruined – and in many cases ended – at an unprecedented rate. As an organization dedicated to the well-being of student-athletes, the NJSIAA is taking a proactive role in addressing what amounts to an outright crisis.”

As a next step, the advisory committee will reach out to potential coalition partners – including medical societies, pharmacy groups, education associations, law enforcement organizations, and others – to gain access to additional thought-leaders, while also broadening support for its protocols.

“Studies indicate that about 80 percent of heroin users started out by abusing narcotic painkillers,” says advisory committee chair John P. Kripsak, D.O. “That statistic makes it frighteningly clear what the stakes are in this battle. It’s an emergency now, and there’s no doubt we need to implement new strategies in our schools to turn the tide.”

Additional details on the prescription drug epidemic, in the form of a New Jersey State Commission of Investigation report. are available by visiting state.nj.us.

TAP Into Another Town's News:

Sign Up for E-News

Summit

Lessons Learned From Summit

April 13, 2018

Over twenty years ago a terrible thing happened in Summit.

The then-mayor prevailed on the police chief to stand before the municipal judge to obtain a warrant to search the files of the chemical counselor of the Summit Junior High School. These files, by statute, were confidential. Nobody knows what the Mayor hoped to learn from this raid. The case wound its way up to the Superior Court, ...

Upcoming Events

Carousel_image_0238521efc57edc6deec_cbc380c3940923447fbf_adobestock_95664806_dragons

Sat, April 21, 2:00 PM

Summit Free Public Library, Summit

Grades K-5: Saturday Serendipity

Arts & Entertainment Education

Carousel_image_92eaadab4fea5d764092_edc2dcd4802a1c409d7c_screen_shot_2018-04-03_at_1.15.57_pm

Sun, April 22, 8:00 AM

Summit Summer Farmers Market, Summit

Summit Farmers Market

Community Calendar Food & Drink Green Health & Wellness

Summit Fire Department Blotter

02/01/2018, 7:26 am - FD dispatched to Route 78 East Bound mile marker 47.2 for a reported motor vehicle accident with entrapment and injuries. On arrival both the Springfield and Summit Fire Departments set up for extrication. The vehicle was chocked to stabilize the vehicle. EMS performed patient care. A hose line was stretched for possible fire suppression by the Berkeley Heights FD.

Summit Police Blotter

April 11, 2018

3/13 - Jayhee Cho, 32, of Summit was arrested and charged with criminal mischief. Mr. Cho was processed and released with a pending court date.

3/13 - Aseyefigh K. Papanye, 30, of Brooklyn, New York was arrested and charged with theft of credit cards, fraudulent use of credit cards, theft by deception, theft by unlawful taking, obstruction of the administration of the law, and possession of ...

Audio: Point View's Petrides Says Despite Company Growth, Netflix Stock Valuation Just Too High

April 18, 2018

Point View Wealth Management's Managing Director and Portfolio Manager, John Petrides, live on Bloomberg Radio discussing what to do with Netflix stock post the strong quarterly results:

ptview.com/medias/tv-radio

Note -  interview starts at 2:00-minute mark.

For nearly 25 years, Point View Wealth Management, Inc. has been working with families in ...

Team Veronica Holds "Be the Match" Drive Apr. 23

Team Veronica is coming to a town near you!

Veronica is a seven-year-old who is in need of a bone marrow transplant. Be The Match is a national registry for finding a match(es) for a bone marrow transplant. It is a simple swab test of the inside of your mouth. 

On Mon., April 23, Be The Match will be at the Bayonne Fire House from 3 - 7 p.m.

Veronica of West ...

Fear of Rising Rates? Remember The Reason You Own Bonds

If the current interest environment has you concerned about your bond portfolio, remember why you are investing in bonds.  The role bonds, or fixed income, play in a portfolio is not solely based on performance.  Bonds are used to offer stability, particularly when stock market volatility is rising. Rate hikes can dampen bond performance, but keep perspective on how rising rates impact ...

Cluelessly Clueless

I teenaged my way through high school under the assumption that my parents had no idea what I was doing.  I like to think I was pretty good at withholding information and presenting situations in ways that were other than they really were.

 

Still, sometimes they found things out.  Like the time my friends plopped me on our front door step at one o'clock in the morning ...

Practice for the PARCC @ Your Library

Students in Grades 3 and up who live in Summit can practice the Math and Language Arts skills that they learned in school and prepare for the upcoming PARCC exam using the Summit Free Public Library’s FREE subscriptions to Lumos Step Up and Learning Express.  

To access Lumos Step Up and Learning Express, visit the library’s website:  www.summitlibrary.org.

Mouse-over ...