American Heart Association recommends forming healthy habits to replace the bad in 2018

SADDLE BROOK, NJ — A new year brings new commitments, new ideas, and most of all New Year’s resolutions. While diet and exercise are usually top of mind, making simple changes to your lifestyle can help you reach that goal and continue to create good habits in your everyday life. 

Substituting healthy habits for unhealthy ones rewards you with more stamina, better quality of life—and a healthier you. This may be easier said than done but with access to information such as Life’s Simple 7 and online workouts, creating a healthy lifestyle is something we all can do at our own pace.

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There is no better time than a new year to look forward and make the changes that lead to a better you.  This is also a great time to explore new hobbies and learn more about yourself to ensure a better future for you and your family.

Here are some small changes you can make in your everyday life that can create a big impact on your overall health:

Stop Smoking. Bad habits are hard to quit. Educate yourself on the benefits of quitting smoking to help motivate you and make a plan to stop. Try replacing your cigarette breaks with a hobby or something that inspires you.

Set Goals. February is American Heart Month. Start the month by setting goals for yourself each week and celebrate your wins.  Break a big goal into smaller, short-term goals to help ease you through it.

Have a Cheat Day. Be sure to allow yourself a break and enjoy your favorite treats in moderation.

Get Educated and Get Involved. Not sure what your blood pressure is? Visit your doctor and know your numbers to help create your overall health plan.  Learn more by joining the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement, a national awareness campaign that educates the public on women’s heart health and stroke.

For more information on Go Red for Women and to attend a luncheon in New Jersey, visit nnjgored.heart.org.

 

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke – the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.