WEST ORANGE, NJ — Beginning at approximately 1:30 p.m. on Monday, the moon will pass between the earth and the sun to create a solar eclipse. New Jersey will experience a partial eclipse, where approximately 70-to-80 percent of the sun will be covered.

The moon will begin passing in front of the sun at approximately 1:30 p.m., reach its peak around 2:45 p.m., and the eclipse will be over around 4:00 p.m. In order to view the eclipse, eye protection is absolutely imperative. 

Staring at the sun without wearing proper protection can damage the retina permanently and can even cause blindness, called solar retinopathy. Michael Landolfi, DO, Chief of the Department of Ophthalmology at Clara Maass Medical Center, an RWJBarnabas Health facility, said preparation is key to enjoying the solar eclipse.

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“It’s important for individuals who want to view the eclipse to recognize the extreme dangers that can result in looking directly at the sun during the event,” he said. “These dangers can include damage to the retina that can lead to permanent reduction in vision and even blindness, which in many cases will be irreversible. For those that want to view the solar eclipse safely they must use special-purpose solar filters or eclipse glasses that have ISO 12312-2 lenses. Anyone that thinks they might have eye damage as a result of the solar eclipse should seek medical attention from an Ophthalmologist immediately.”

Follow NASA's guidelines for safe viewing of the eclipse. Those with eclipse glasses are asked to ensure that they are listed on the AAS Reputable Vendors List.

It is also possible to view the eclipse indirectly via Pinhole Projection, which can be performed building a viewing apparatus or by creating a pinhole with fingers, or through trees, which naturally create pinholes.

The pinhole method should not be used to look directly at the sun, which should only be done with proper eye protection. 

Additional safety information on the solar eclipse can be found on NASA.com.