WESTFIELD, NJ – Lora Condon, owner of Jersey Boutique Spa at 331 West Broad St., recently presented a check for $1,500 to the Freedom Alliance. Condon was awarded the money for her chosen charity after submitting a video to the 2017 Skin Games Competition – an international platform that showcases the services and talents of professionals in the beauty industry. 

Condon’s video was submitted into the “Compassion” category and showcased how she uses her esthetic skills to serve those in the military:

Not only does Condon treat military personnel and first responders, she also donates 10 percent of the proceeds from her Beauty Buster Skincare line to the Freedom Alliance. The charity has donated more than $10 million in college scholarships to the sons and daughters of America’s military heroes.

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According to the Freedom Alliance’s website, “These soldiers, airmen, Marines and guardsmen have sacrificed life or limb defending our country. We care for their families by helping their children achieve the dream of a college education.”

“After hearing all these stories from my father the Marine and my stepfather the Vietnam vet, I was really inspired to get involved and to show our military families and soldiers that we care about them, we love them and we are here to support them,” Condon said in her 2017 Skin Games submission video.

Mayor Andy Skibitsky and Councilman Keith Loughlin, along with Freedom Alliance President Tom Kilgannon and his associate Matthew Higgins, celebrated the presentation of the check at a ceremony hosted at Condon’s shop. The Freedom Alliance also invited Jacob Rangel, a college scholarship recipient whose father was killed while serving in Iraq.

“We take great pride in helping the children of fallen and wounded servicemen,” Kilgannon said. “Each year the Freedom Alliance gives out over $1 million in college scholarships to kids who have a parent who was killed or permanently disabled in military service. Right now we have 323 students that we are helping.”

“It is my honor to work with them,” said Condon about helping people in the military.  “I think sometimes that I get more out of it than they do.”